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I have a sample file like this.

[unit id="20"]
...blah blah...
[/unit]
[unit id="AB 560"]
...
[/unit]
[unit id="205"]
...
[/unit]
[unit id="AB 580"]
...
[/unit]
[unit id="120"]
...
[/unit]
[unit id="AB 210"]
...
[/unit]

I want to delete lines containing the string "AB" and 10 lines following it. To be specific, there will be 10 lines between [unit ...] and [/unit]. The output file should look like:

[unit id="20"]
...blah blah...
[/unit]
[unit id="205"]
...
[/unit]
[unit id="120"]
...
[/unit]

Note: Only "AB" will be present. No other character/string. I need an executable unix shell script for this -- no Perl, please.

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1  
This doesn't look like XML. –  Lev Levitsky Feb 23 '13 at 13:22

2 Answers 2

You can simply find AB, and then delete both such line and the 10 lines following it. As pointed by @Lev Levitsky, this allowed by GNU sed only:

sed '/AB/,+10 {d}' <infile>

If you want to apply the modifications to the given file, just add the flag -i, for in-place substitution. Notice, as pointed by @Jens, that this is a GNUism:

sed -i '/AB/,+10 {d}' <infile>
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sed can do that?! –  Lev Levitsky Feb 23 '13 at 13:37
2  
+1, it works for me (at least on GNU sed). Where did you learn that though? The best reference I know is this one, and I didn't see it there. P.S. You don't need {} for a single command, btw. –  Lev Levitsky Feb 23 '13 at 13:39
2  
sed -i for in-place edits is a GNUism and should be avoided in portable code. There is however talk about including it in a future POSIX revision (more than 5 years away, I'd say). –  Jens Feb 23 '13 at 13:49
1  
You're right, found it in man sed... Says it's the GNU sed-only trick as well. –  Lev Levitsky Feb 23 '13 at 13:55
1  
Me neither :) But people around here tend to nitpick about such stuff :) –  Lev Levitsky Feb 23 '13 at 14:00

You may prefer to do it based on patterns and not just + 10lines.

perl -n -e 'unless(/^\[unit.*AB.*\]/../\[\/unit\]/) { print; }'  tx

tx file is

[unit id="20"]
20...blah blah...
[/unit]
[unit id="AB 560"]
AB...
[/unit]
[unit id="205"]
205 ...
[/unit]
[unit id="AB 580"]
AB...
[/unit]
[unit id="120"]
120...
[/unit]
[unit id="AB 210"]
AB...
[/unit]

Gives

[unit id="20"]
20...blah blah...
[/unit]
[unit id="205"]
205 ...
[/unit]
[unit id="120"]
120...
[/unit]
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