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What is wrong with the line in the header?

The below example is supposed to make a button which will increment a counter each time it is clicked. However, I enforce a delay of 2000 ms between button clicks. The version below works, however, if I use the commented out line instead of

document.getElementById("rollButton").onclick=function(){calculation()};

(both in function afterWaiting())

I get various odd results, for instance that the counter starts incrementing by a lot more than 1, and the waiting time disappears?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>

    <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.3/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script>

        function afterWaiting()
        {
            $("#rollButton").css("color","black");
            //$("#rollButton").click(function(){calculation()});
            document.getElementById("rollButton").onclick=function(){calculation()};

        }

        var counter=0;
        function calculation()
        {

            ////Enforcing wait:
            document.getElementById("rollButton").style.color="red";
            document.getElementById("rollButton").onclick="";
            window.setTimeout("afterWaiting()",2000);


            counter=counter+1;
            document.getElementById("test").innerHTML=counter;

            }



    </script>

    </head>
<body>

  <button type="button" onclick="calculation()" id="rollButton"> Roll! </button>

<p id="test"> </p>


</body>
</html> 

What have I misunderstood?

thanks in advance :)

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/Bwxb9/

share|improve this question
    
Can you please a JS fiddle , and what does the console says –  Sedz Feb 23 '13 at 13:34
    
I'm running it through the browser, which doesn't make any complaints? –  Kaare Feb 23 '13 at 13:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The only code required is

<button type="button" id="rollButton"> Roll! </button>
<p id="test"> </p>


var counter = 0;
var $test = $('#test');
var $rollButton = $('#rollButton');
function increment(){
    $test.html(counter++);
    $rollButton.off('click', increment);
    setTimeout(function(){
        $rollButton.on('click', increment);
    }, 2000);
}
$rollButton.on('click', increment);

Demo: Fiddle

Updated: as suggested by Andy, but I would recommend Andy's answer as it involves no additional event manipulation

var counter = 0;
var $test = $('#test');
var $rollButton = $('#rollButton');
function increment(){
    $test.html(counter++);
    setTimeout(function(){
        $rollButton.one('click', increment);
    }, 2000);
}
$rollButton.one('click', increment);

Demo: Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
i that case you could also use .one() api.jquery.com/one instead of .on(). this way you don't have to call off(). –  Andy Feb 23 '13 at 14:46
    
@Andy Yes you are right –  Arun P Johny Feb 23 '13 at 14:47

The difference is that when you apply event handlers through onclick as you do in your original version, you can only bind one handler to the element. And using onclick="" kind of clears it.

When using jQuery .click(handler) you bind a new handler each time you call it (and you can unbind it with unbind('click') (and not with onclick=""). So after a couple of calls to afterWaiting you have applied mulitple click handlers on your element, and on each click the calculation function runs multiple times..

So, one way to correct it is to replace

document.getElementById("rollButton").onclick=""; 

with

$('#rollButton').unbind('click');
share|improve this answer
    
and not with onclick="" -- are you sure? How is jQuery bound to that element? –  Jan Dvorak Feb 23 '13 at 13:47
1  
@JanDvorak it is bound using the addEventListener (or addEvent of old IE) which works in a different way (read stackoverflow.com/questions/6348494/addeventlistener-vs-onclick) –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Feb 23 '13 at 13:55

That's generally a bit of an odd and confusing approach. Here's how i'd do it, without mixing jquery and pure js (onclick) too much:

http://jsfiddle.net/LGvKS/

var wait = false;
counter = 0;
$('button').click(function(){
    if(!wait){
        $('span').text(++counter);
        wait=true;
        setTimeout(function(){
            wait=false;
        },2000);
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
well, I'm doing it this way because I'm learning jQuery, so trying to transition from the js version to a jQuery without breaking stuff. –  Kaare Feb 23 '13 at 13:42
1  
@Kaare Sure, nothing wrong with that. It sounded more harsh than i intended it to be. –  Andy Feb 23 '13 at 13:44
1  
I think what @Andy points out here (in his code) is that you don't need to remove the event handler each time. Just set a flag (or you could disable the button) for 2 secs. And that's what I would aslo do. –  Onur Yıldırım Feb 23 '13 at 13:51
    
@Andy no problem :) –  Kaare Feb 24 '13 at 2:38

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