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class Test
    f1: -> console.log 'f1'
    f2: -> console.log 'f2'

    f:
        f3: -> f1()

test = new Test
test.f.f3()

When I run this in NodeJS, I get this:

ReferenceError: f1 is not defined

I want to run f1 from f.f3. How can I do that?

Thanks!

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There's really no relationship between the object "f" and the parent object of "f", so you'd have to explicitly pass a reference to the parent object into "f3". (edit oops maybe I'm wrong :-) –  Pointy Feb 23 '13 at 13:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My first answer was not correct, but this works (a slight modification):

class Test
  f1: -> console.log 'f1'
  f2: -> console.log 'f2'
  f: =>
    f3: => @f1()

test = new Test
test.f().f3()
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Yes, this works, but then I have to call f too. Wouldn't this lead to some side effects later? And something I need be careful about when using this? –  Arjun Bajaj Feb 23 '13 at 14:11
    
The trouble is that the this pointer when f is defined as an object becomes a pointer to the class itself, so the method it tries to call becomes Test.f1(). Since f1 is not a static method that does not work. My workaround should not introduce any significant side effects and effectively carries the correct instance pointer (this) through to the inner function. If you are able to make f1 and f2 static functions, something similar to your original attempt except using @f1() should work. –  Marius Kjeldahl Feb 23 '13 at 14:16
    
I tried making f1 static (@f1). It works properly. But I want to ask which method is better? Is it good practice to make f1 static? –  Arjun Bajaj Feb 23 '13 at 14:24
    
If it never accesses any instance data, yes, declaring it static is the way to go. But if you need access to any instance data (data which is unique to each instance after you new it), then you have no other choice than to declare it as a member function (non-static). –  Marius Kjeldahl Feb 23 '13 at 14:26
    
Thanks for the explanation. I'll go with your method, because in some places I'm using instance data. Thanks! :D –  Arjun Bajaj Feb 23 '13 at 14:32
class Test
  constructor: ->
    @f =
      f3: => @f1()

  f1: -> console.log 'f1'

test = new Test
test.f.f3()

Assign it in the constructor to get your this, you won't need to call f then.

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