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I would like to do searches in strings with "Google" style, using operators such as "or", "and" and "not". It is possible simulate this operators in regular expressions?

For example, I want to do the following searches in a given string using the words "Javascript", "PHP" and "Perl".

  1. Javascript and PHP
  2. Javascript and not PHP
  3. Javascript and PHP and Perl
  4. Javascript and (PHP or Perl)

PS: I don't mind about case sensitive issue, because there is a option in all important languages.

EDIT after comments: It's obvious that it's possible run ANY boolean expression using several pattern matching scans, however, it is interesting to think in a solution inside a single regular expression. Besides, "look forward" feature allows solve very complex pattern matching issues.

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1  
What you mean is "is it possible to do this in a single regex". Because it is of course trivial to do it in multiple, e.g. /Javascript/ and !/PHP/, or /Javascript/ and (/PHP/ or /Perl/), etc. –  TLP Feb 23 '13 at 15:18
    
With many regular expressions are trivial, @TLP. However is is more agile, efficient and elegant do it in a single regular expression, it's just one parsing. Just thing submit this search in millions of records in a Database. –  Paulo Buchsbaum Feb 23 '13 at 15:23
4  
Actually, doing a benchmark on your sample string I found that two single regexes are 75% faster than your combined. It may be more elegant, but its not more readable and not (necessarily) more efficient. See it here –  TLP Feb 23 '13 at 15:32
5  
Far too often I see questions on Stack Overflow from people bent on making the Perl regex engine jump through hoops by writing complex conditions in a single, unintelligible expression. It seems to come from the same mentality as a determination to compress a Perl program a similarly opaque one-liner. Do yourself a favour: write your code in the clearest most maintainable way, and you are likely to find it to be also the most efficient. If you find the performance unacceptable then do some profiling to find out which part of the code needs accelerating. Fancy code is poor code. –  Borodin Feb 23 '13 at 16:14
1  
@TLP, against facts there are no arguments! However sometimes it is interesting discover the huge power of regular expressions. I've liked to sharing this with the community, in a easy example –  Paulo Buchsbaum Feb 23 '13 at 17:55

1 Answer 1

Yes!

Thanks to "look forward" operator, which was introduced in Regular Expression syntax in Perl language. The Perl RegEx framework is used by many languages​​, including PHP and Javascript.

Exist also the "look behind" operator in Perl, but it's not supported in Javascript.

Below, I show the regular expression with JavaScript syntax for your searches:

1- Searching for ( "Javascript" and "PHP" )

       S = "Javascript is a client language and PHP is a server language";
       patt = /^(?=.*Javascript).*PHP/;    
       if ( S.match(patt) ) 
         document.write("Found it!"); 
       else 
          document.write("Not Found");

It prints "Found it".

2- Now searching for ( "Javascript" and not "PHP" )

     S = "Javascript is a client language and PHP is a server language"; 
     patt = patt = /^(?!.*PHP).*Javascript/;
     if ( S.match(patt) ) 
       document.write("Found it!"); 
     else 
       document.write("Not Found");

It prints "Not Found" because PHP is contained in the string.

3- The third search is ( "Javascript" and "PHP" and "Perl" )

    S = "Javascript rules, PHP are in most server, however Perl is inspiring";
    patt = /^(?=.*Javascript)^(?=.*PHP).*Perl/;
    if ( S.match(patt) ) 
       document.write("Found it!"); 
    else 
       document.write("Not Found");

It prints "Found it!".

4- Finally, the last case is ("Javascript" and ("PHP" or "Perl")). There's nothing different, I just use the traditional grouping with parentheses (round brackets):

    S = "Javascript rules, however Perl is inspiring"; 
    patt = /^(?=.*Javascript)(.*PHP|.*Perl)/;
    if ( S.match(patt) ) 
       document.write("Found it!"); 
    else 
       document.write("Not Found");

It prints "Found it!" because PHP is missing, but Perl is in string.

Edit after comments:

I've admit it. "Look Forward" has a awful syntax. However, it is easy to understand. The scanner looks at but don't walk!

        patt = /Bee (?=Gees)/;     // patt = patt1(?=patt2) => patt1 + patt2 
        S = "Bee Gees";
        if (S.match(patt)) 
              document.write('ok');  // print OK and cursor stops at "G"

That is the positive look forward

       patt = /Bee (?!Gees)/;   // patt = patt1(?!patt2) => patt1 + Not (patt2) 
       S = "Bee Gees";         
       if (S.match(patt)) 
             document.write('ok'); // it does not match
       S = "Bee Goes";         
       if (S.match(patt)) 
             document.write('ok'); // print OK and cursor stops at "G"

That is the negative look forward

The great news is that Patt2 can be a complex pattern, with grouping, subgrouping, etc.

Final explanations:

  • .* : 0 or more characters
  • ^ : Match if is the start of the string. it does not move the cursor.
  • $ : Match if is the end of the string. it does not move the cursor.
  • (p1|p2|...) : Match if p1 or p2 or ... is matched.

So

         patt = /^(?=.*Javascript).*PHP/; 

is a regular expression (/ is a RegEx delimiter as quotations to strings) that means Looks Forward to ( jump characters until find "Javascript" ) and, if it will succeed, jump characters until find "PHP" (Just remember that look forward doesn't moves the cursor!) i.e, "PHP" just match if the scanner finds "Javascript".

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