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Suppose you have a database with the following content:

son(a, d).
son(b, d).
son(a, c).
son(b, c).

So a and b are sons of d and c. Now you want to know, given a bigger database, who is brother to who. A solution would be:

brother(X, Y) :-
    son(X, P),
    son(Y, P),
    X \= Y.

The problem with this is that if you ask "brother(X, Y)." and start pressing ";" you'll get redundant results like:

  • X = a, Y = b;
  • X = b, Y = a;
  • X = a, Y = b;
  • X = b, Y = a;

I can understand why I get these results but I am looking for a way to fix this. What can I do?

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5 Answers

You can eliminate one set with a comparison:

brother(X, Y) :-
   son(X, P),
   son(Y, P),
   X \= Y, X @< Y.

?- brother(X, Y).
X = a,
Y = b ;
X = a,
Y = b ;
false.

Since X and Y will be instantiated both ways, requiring X be less than Y is a good way to cut the solutions in half.

Your second problem is that X and Y are brothers by more than one parent. The easiest solution here would be to make your rules more explicit:

mother(a, d).
mother(b, d).
father(a, c).
father(b, c).

brother(X, Y) :-
  mother(X, M), mother(Y, M),
  father(X, F), father(Y, F),
  X \= Y, X @< Y.

?- brother(X, Y).
X = a,
Y = b ;
false.

This method is very specific to this particular problem, but the underlying reasoning is not: you had two copies because a and b are "brothers" by c and also by d—Prolog was right to produce that solution twice because there was a hidden variable being instantiated to two different values.

A more elegant solution would probably be to use setof/3 to get the solutions. This can work even with your original code:

?- setof(X-Y, (brother(X, Y), X @< Y), Brothers).
Brothers = [a-b].

The downside to this approach is that you wind up with a list rather than Prolog generating different solutions, though you can recover that behavior with member/2.

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This can solve the problem of repeating solutions but raises another. Asking ":- brother('a', 'b')." returns true, but asking "brother('b', 'a')." returns false. But thanks for the answer. It's a nice and simple trick that does solve part of what I wanted. –  petermlm Feb 25 '13 at 0:39
    
That's true, but it would be very bad Prolog style to want brother(b, a) to be true but not generated by brother(X, Y). In general you don't want to fail to generate acceptable solutions. –  Daniel Lyons Feb 25 '13 at 5:05
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Prolog will always try to find every possible solution available for your statements considering your set of truths. The expansion works as depth-first search:

son(a, d).
son(b, d).
son(a, c).
son(b, c).

brother(X, Y) :-
    son(X, P),
    son(Y, P),
    X \= Y.

                         brother(X, Y)
       _______________________|____________________________        [son(X, P)]
      |               |                  |                 |
X = a, P = d     X = b, P = d       X = a, P = c      X = a, P = b
      |               |                  |                 |  
      |              ...                ...               ...
      |
      | (X and P are already defined for this branch;
      |  the algorithm now looks for Y's)
      |__________________________________________                  [son(Y, d)]
                |                                |
      son(a, d) -> Y = a               son(b, d) -> Y = b
                |                                |
                |                                |                 [X \= Y]
      X = a, Y = a -> false            X = a, Y = b -> true
                                                 |
                                                 |
                                  solution(X = a, Y = b, P = d)

But, as you can see, the expansion will be performed in all the branches, so you'll end up with more of the same solution as the final answer. As pointed by @Daniel Lyons, you may use the setof built-in.

You may also use the ! -- cut operator -- that stops the "horizontal" expansion, once a branch has been found to be valid, or add some statement that avoids the multiple solutions.

For further information, take a look at the Unification algorithm.

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1  
I actually understood this. I was trying to find a way to fix the problem and I did. Thanks for the very elaborate answer. –  petermlm Feb 25 '13 at 0:36
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This should work. But I think it can be improved (I am not a Prolog specialist):

brother(X, Y) :-
    son(X, P1),
    son(Y, P1),
    X @< Y,
    (son(X, P2), son(Y, P2), P1 @< P2 -> false; true).
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Like I said to @Daniel Lyons. This is also a nice solution for the problem but it raises another. Asking ":- brother('a', 'b')." returns true, but asking "brother('b', 'a')." returns false. Thanks for the answer, I didn't know the notation of your last line. –  petermlm Feb 25 '13 at 0:44
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If you're using Strawberry Prolog compiler,you won't get all the answers by typing this:

?- brother(X, Y),
   write(X), nl,
   write(Y), nl.

In order to get all the answers write this:

?- brother(X, Y),
   write(X), nl,
   write(Y), nl,
   fail.

I hope it helps you.:)

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Actually I am using swipl and can't test your solution. But it's always nice to have the answer for the many available platforms! –  petermlm Feb 25 '13 at 0:45
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I got to an answer.

% Include the dictionary
:- [p1]. % The dictionary with sons

:- dynamic(found/2).

brother(X, Y) :-
    % Get two persons from the database to test
    son(X, P),
    son(Y, P),

    % Test if the two persons are different and were not already used
    testBrother(X, Y).

% If it got here it's because there is no one else to test above, so just fail and retract all
brother(_, _) :-
    retract(found(_, _)),
    fail.

testBrother(X, Y) :-
    X \= Y,
    \+found(X, Y),
    \+found(Y, X),

    % If they were not used succed and assert what was found
    assert(found(X, Y)).

It always returns fails in the end but it succeeds with the following.

  • brother(X, Y). % Every brother without repetition
  • brother('Urraca', X). % Every brother of Urraca without repetition
  • brother('Urraca', 'Sancho I'). % True, because Urraca and Sancho I have the same father and mother. In fact, even if they only had the same mother or the same father it would return true. A little off context but still valid, if they have three or more common parents it would still work

It fails with the following:

  • brother(X, X). % False because it's the same person
  • brother('Nope', X). % False because not is not even in the database
  • brother('Nope', 'Sancho I'). % False, same reason

So like this I can, for example, ask: brother(X, Y), and start pressing ";" to see every brother and sister without any repetition.

I can also do brother(a, b) and brother(b, a), assuming a and b are persons in the database. This is important because some solutions would use @< to test things and like so brother(b, a) would fail.

So there it is.

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It works, but it's not something I would want to do in my own code. I consider the dynamic store to be kind of a last resort, a way to hack around the usual try/bind/fail/unbind unification Prolog wants to do. Having dynamic state that magically appears and disappears during what appear to be purely-logical predicates is a lot of machinery and a lot of places to hide bugs. If I saw this in a codebase, I'd worry that things like this might be happening all over, making the software hard to isolate and debug. –  Daniel Lyons Feb 25 '13 at 5:10
    
I see. Thanks for you feedback (In here and the other comment) I do agree with what you said, but I really needed this like I showed. –  petermlm Feb 25 '13 at 14:37
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