Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some trouble with casting attributes "automatically".

public abstract class MyType<T> {
    public abstract T getValue(String content);
}

public class MyString extends MyType<String> {
    @Override
    public String getValue(String content) {
        return String.valueOf(content);
    }
}

public class MyInteger extends MyType<Integer> {
    @Override
    public Integer getValue(String content) {
        return Integer.valueOf(content);
    }
}

public class User {
    private String _name;
    private int _id;

    public void setName(String name) {
        _name = name;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return _name;
    }

    public void setId(int id) {
        _id = id;
    }

    public int getId() {
        return _id;
    }
}

public class MainTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ArrayList<MyType> myTypes = new ArrayList<MyType>();
        myTypes.add(new MyString());
        myTypes.add(new MyInteger());

        User user = new User();

        for (MyType myType : myTypes) {
            try {
                user.setName((String) myType.getValue("foobar")); // getValue always returns an Object that I have to parse
                user.setId((Integer) myType.getValue("42")); // getValue always returns an Object that I have to parse
            } catch (Exception e) {
            }
        }
    }
}

Please keep in mind that this is only an abstract example of my problem.

How can I replace the castings? I need something like this:

user.setName((user.getName().getClass()) myType.getValue("foobar"));

Unfortunately eclipse tells me that this is wrong The method getValue(String) is undefined for the type Class<capture#3-of ? extends String>

I will not cast explicity. I will cast more implicity/automatically.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

The problem is that the myTypes list is declared as a List<MyType>, which uses the raw type MyType instead of a particular parameterization of MyType in the list. This is generally discouraged, warned against, bad practice, etc.

Ordinarily you'd declare the list like List<MyType<String>> or List<MyType<Integer>>. That would enable you to get elements out without having to cast. However, this is problematic because you want to be able to mix MyType<String> and MyType<Integer> in the same list. Again, this is generally not recommended, and is a code smell.

So you could declare a List<MyType<?>> instead, which is better than List<MyType>, but not by much. The only correct conclusion is that the design is inherently flawed: don't try to mix heterogeneous types in collections.*


The class MyType was just an abstract example. Actually my question was how I can cast: user.setName((user.getName().getClass()) object); if object is Object object = "foobar";

Regardless, the problem is still fundamentally that you're using raw types in the list. It seems like you might be better off using something that maintains the type parameterization, such as a Map<Class<T>, MyType<T>> instead of a List<MyType>.

Consider applying the strategy pattern here.


*Expert mode: unless there is a sensible common supertype which you can use as an upper bound.

share|improve this answer
    
The class MyType was just an abstract example. Actually my question was how I can cast: user.setName((user.getName().getClass()) object); if object is Object object = "foobar"; –  erwingun2010 Feb 23 '13 at 16:08
    
@user1873520 see my edit. –  Matt Ball Feb 23 '13 at 16:30

I agree 100% with Matt Ball's answer. A simple, quick solution, though maybe not the ideal one, is to remove the abstractness from MyType and add the ability to get the value as a specific type. You'll find this kind of pattern in ResultSet in the standard library, among other places:

public class MyType {
    private String content;
    MyType(String content) { this.content = content }
    public String getStringValue() { return content; }
    public Integer getIntValue() { return Integer.parseInt(content); }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not a half-bad idea. –  Matt Ball Feb 23 '13 at 15:53
    
Like I mentioned above, it was just an abstract example. The real problem/question was the casting => How I can cast: user.setName((user.getName().getClass()) object); if object is Object object = "foobar"; –  erwingun2010 Feb 23 '13 at 16:10
1  
You can't for all the same reasons that Matt listed in his answer. You don't have the necessary type information. The only thing you could do here is use reflection, which is almost always the wrong solution outside of infrastructure-ish code. –  Ryan Stewart Feb 23 '13 at 16:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.