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Hi all i asked a question about how to delete all files from folders in a directory but keep the folders, this can be found here :

How to delete files of a directory but not the folders - JAVA

one of the purposed solutions was to use recurisive, to achieve this :

public void DeleteFiles() {
    File file =
       new File(
          "D:/Documents/NetBeansProjects/printing~subversion/fileupload/web/"+
          "resources/pdf/");
    System.out.println("Called deleteFiles");
    if (file.isDirectory()) {
        for (File f : file.listFiles()) {
            DeleteFiles();
        }
    } else {
        file.delete();
    }
}

however i just get a console full of Called deleteFiles, untill i get the stack overflow error, it does not seem to o through the directory to find files and delete them, how can i achieve this ?

Thanks :)

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2  
Your recursion is obviously wrong, you should take some paper and write down your logic, that might help you –  RC. Feb 23 '13 at 15:57
    
If you look at the original answer for that question which used recursion it had an argument stackoverflow.com/questions/15041971/… –  Arun P Johny Feb 23 '13 at 15:59

3 Answers 3

Recursion is asking for trouble when there are much simpler solutions. With commons-io:

import java.io.File;
import org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils;
import static org.apache.commons.io.filefilter.TrueFileFilter.TRUE;

File root = new File("D:/Documents/NetBeansProjects/printing~subversion/fileupload/web/resources/pdf/");
Iterator<File> files = FileUtils.iterateFiles(root, TRUE, TRUE);
for (File file : files) {
    file.delete();
}

or with JDK 7:

import java.nio.file.*;
import java.nio.file.attribute.BasicFileAttributes;

Path root = Paths.get("D:/Documents/NetBeansProjects/printing~subversion/fileupload/web/resources/pdf/");
Files.walkFileTree(root, new SimpleFileVisitor<Path>() {
    @Override
    public FileVisitResult visitFile(Path file, BasicFileAttributes attrs)
            throws IOException {
        file.delete();
        return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
    }
})
share|improve this answer
    
recursion is in many cases the simpliest way of implementation. Your approach requires including an external library and it uses recusrsion too –  Trinimon Feb 23 '13 at 17:05
    
@Andre: 1) JDK7 isn't an external library. 2) In the vast majority of Java development, adding a library to accomplish some task is the preferred way of solving a problem precisely because it removes the complexity from your code, as above. 3) None of my code above is recursive, which is the point: my code is simpler because the implementation is provided by a reliable library, and I don't have to care about the that implementation. –  Ryan Stewart Feb 23 '13 at 18:55
    
sorry, 1. org.apache.commons is definitely an external library (check out ORACLE JDK1.7 API docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api), 2. is not valid in all cases, for instance if you have limited resources (Android, J2ME), license concerns or need customizations 3. and again: org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils does use recursion (see iterateFiles/listFiles/innerListFiles at grepcode.com/file/repo1.maven.org/maven2/commons-io/commons-io/… –  Trinimon Feb 23 '13 at 19:20
    
@Andre: I gave two options. One is a library, and one comes with JDK 7. JDK 7 isn't an external library. The commons-io version is simpler, but take your pick. And how it's done under the covers isn't the point. Obviously the OP is having trouble writing a recursive method. My solution doesn't require him/her to do so. That's the important part here. –  Ryan Stewart Feb 23 '13 at 19:27
    
I never claimed, that your "JDK 7" solution depends on an external library - however, the other does definitely. Further on you should take into consideration, that not all environments support JDK 7 (e.g. Android or many products that still rely on 1.6 or earlier). From that perspective your solutions might be inappropriate. - and that's exact the point: all we do is giving proposals! It's up to the user who posted the question to decide what he prefers, whether he wants to dig into libraries or recursion. You shouldn't depreciate fundamental paradigms due to your personal preferences. Thx –  Trinimon Feb 23 '13 at 21:47
public void DeleteFiles() {
    File file = new File("D:/Documents/NetBeansProjects/printing~subversion/fileupload/web/resources/pdf/");
    System.out.println("Called deleteFiles");
    DeleteFiles(file);
}

public void DeleteFiles(File file) {
    if (file.isDirectory()) {
        for (File f : file.listFiles()) {
            DeleteFiles(f);
        }
    } else {
        file.delete();
    }
}
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 File file = new File("D:/Documents/NetBeansProjects/printing~subversion/fileupload/web/resources/pdf/");

You are creating the same file again and again. Declare that file outside the function.

Your recursion is different from the suggested one.

public void DeleteFiles( File file) {
    System.out.println("Called deleteFiles");
    if (file.isDirectory()) {
        for (File f : file.listFiles()) {
            DeleteFiles(f);
        }
    } else {
        file.delete();
    }
}
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