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I'm unsure as to whether this code will not compile.

The example code I'm working with:

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

class Foo {
    public:
        template<typename T>
        Foo& operator<<(const T& t) {
            cout << t;
            return *this;
        }
};

int main() {
    Foo foo;
    foo << "Hello World"; // perfectly fine
    foo << endl; // shit hits the fan

    return 0;
}

This is the error:

test.cpp:19:12: error: no match for ‘operator<<’ in ‘foo << std::endl’
test.cpp:19:12: note: candidates are:
test.cpp:10:14: note: template<class T> Foo& Foo::operator<<(const T&)
test.cpp:10:14: note:   template argument deduction/substitution failed:
test.cpp:19:12: note:   couldn't deduce template parameter ‘T’

I'm confused as to why it cannot substitute the function type of endl (ostream& (*)(ostream&)) for T, where it clearly is fine with doing it when you specify cout << endl;

I find it additionally puzzling that this fixes the problem [ edited ]

Foo& operator<<(ostream& (*f)(ostream&)) {
    cout << f;
    return *this;
}

In case the question isn't clear, I'm asking why it could not deduce the template in the first place.

share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to achieve? Any particular reason you're not deriving from std::basic_ostream<C,CT> or implementing a streambuf? –  sehe Feb 23 '13 at 16:41
    
To the last question: It couldn't deduce the template in the first place, because multiple overloads were applicable - hence the function-reference case was ambiguous. –  sehe Feb 23 '13 at 17:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

endl is a manipulator, i.e. it's an unresolved function type. There are several overloads, and the type deduction is unable to decide which one you want.

More specificly, here's what endl looks like (in GNU libc++):

/**
 *  @brief  Write a newline and flush the stream.
 *
 *  This manipulator is often mistakenly used when a simple newline is
 *  desired, leading to poor buffering performance.  See
 *  http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/libstdc++/manual/bk01pt11ch25s02.html
 *  for more on this subject.
*/
template<typename _CharT, typename _Traits>
  inline basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>&
  endl(basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& __os)
  { return flush(__os.put(__os.widen('\n'))); }

Updated So, the problem is, the compiler cannot deduce which instance of endl you would be passing (it's an unresolved overload). You might work around this by doing a static_cast<ostream&(*)(ostream&)>(endl) instead.

Of course, that's not convenient. Here's a simple fix: http://liveworkspace.org/code/2F2VHe$1

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

class Foo : public std::ostream
{
    public:
        template<typename T>
        Foo& operator<<(T&& t) {
            cout << std::forward<T>(t);
            return *this;
        }

        typedef std::ostream& (manip)(std::ostream&);

        Foo& operator<<(manip& m) {
            cout << m;
            return *this;
        }
};

int main() {
    Foo foo;
    foo << "Hello World"; // perfectly fine
    foo << endl; // everything is fine

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you explain further, is the reason because it doesn't actually try the different overload substitutions to determine the correct one? Or am I expecting too much from the compiler –  Anthony Sottile Feb 23 '13 at 16:44
    
@AnthonySottile I provided a simple sample of how to cater for manipulator endl: liveworkspace.org/code/2F2VHe$1 –  sehe Feb 23 '13 at 16:45
    
Could you embellish on the differences between your code and the code I had above and the reasons for the differences. For instance, my current "solution" does the same thing with explicitly defining the overload for the manipulator -- but could you explain the use of std::forward. Also could you explain the reasoning behind why the compiler is unable to choose the overload without that explicit definition. –  Anthony Sottile Feb 23 '13 at 16:48
    
@AnthonySottile Ah sorry, std::forward is part of perfect forwarding and it's not essential to the issue. I guess it's the force of habit I wrote that :) See e.g. stackoverflow.com/a/5481588/85371 –  sehe Feb 23 '13 at 16:58
    
I embellished on the explanation of endl as a manipulator, and answered your last question explicitely. –  sehe Feb 23 '13 at 17:05

The problem is that endl is a manipulator defined as a function template. Paragraph 27.7.1 of the C++11 Standard specifies its signature:

template <class charT, class traits>
basic_ostream<charT,traits>& endl(basic_ostream<charT,traits>& os);
template <class charT, class traits>

Moreover, per Paragraph 13.3.1 on overload resolution:

In each case where a candidate is a function template, candidate function template specializations are generated using template argument deduction (14.8.3, 14.8.2). Those candidates are then handled as candidate functions in the usual way.

Your operator << is a defined as a template, and the compiler needs to deduce the type of T. However, how can the compiler know which instantiation of endl you meant? How can it deduce the template arguments charT and traits? There is nothing else in your call to operator << from which it could be deduced.

You have two ways out of this problem. Either you cast the type of endl explicitly, to tell the compiler which overload shall be picked:

foo << (std::ostream& (*)(std::ostream&))endl;

Or, as you did, you create an overload of operator << which accepts a function with that specific signature. Your compiler will now select it:

Foo& operator<<(ostream& (*f)(ostream&)) 
{
    return *this << f;
}

Inside this function definition there is no ambiguity as to what f is: its type is precisely defined. However, be careful here: this function doesn't likely do what you expect! In fact, it just keeps calling itself, generating an infinite recursion!

Therefore, this assertion:

[...] note I'm actually calling my other method implementation:

Is incorrect: you're not calling the other method implementation, you keep calling the same function over and over again.

share|improve this answer
    
shoot, good catch, I probably should have ran my code instead of just checking it compiles... –  Anthony Sottile Feb 23 '13 at 16:56

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