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My question is different from though similar to the ones such as:

Tools to reverse engineer C++ ( i.e. to view C++ classes )

Instead of looking for class diagrams, I'm more interested in finding call chains and dependencies and generating nice-looking graphs.

Is there such a tool? I know cscope and ctags can do a little bit of what I'd like to do but in very much low-level interactive manners (one query at a time). I'd like something more automated, e.g., given an API, find all its sub-routine call paths till it reaches the leaf and show them to me.

Is there a tool for this already? Is it possible to do it at the binary level? like reverse-engineering function dependencies in a library (.a, .so, .dll as input)?

EDIT:

I prefer static analysis tool over profilers since I would like it to work for library and module code as well.

Also I prefer cross-platform solutions. I'm mainly on a Mac but tools for Linux or Windows will be interesting as well.

UPDATE

After researching into the recommendations I decided that Doxygen is what I want. It gives caller and callee graphs, and uses static analysis, cross-platform, and free.

Thanks to all the other recommendations. They opened my eyes quite a bit.

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Have you tried using valgrind with the callgrind tool? –  alestanis Feb 23 '13 at 16:53
    
Thanks. That seems to be on the profiler route as gprof does. More useful for debugging a program. –  kakyo Feb 23 '13 at 23:57
    
Promoted my comments about valgrind into an answer, as nobody mentioned them –  alestanis Feb 24 '13 at 9:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Doxygen can display caller and callee trees:
Doxygen

Edit 1:
Example Doxygen call trees

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Thanks. I didn't know Doxygen can do more than generating docs. I'll have to test its robustness though. Curious, is there an example (e.g., graph) showing the result? –  kakyo Feb 23 '13 at 20:57
    
@kakyo: See my latest edit 1. –  Thomas Matthews Feb 25 '13 at 23:50

CppDepend looks totally awesome for the task.

enter image description here

http://www.cppdepend.com/

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Thanks. Looks very polished and probably the closest to what I want as an all-around analyzer. Too bad it's so pricy! Voted up. –  kakyo Feb 23 '13 at 21:03

you can use DEPENDS application which detects most of C C++ and C# libraries in windows.
but still wont give you call chains...
here's the link DEPENDS

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1  
Thanks. Looks interesting. Pity that it only works for Windows. Although it's not exactly what I was looking for. It may be useful later. Hope it gives more than Dumpbin. Voted up. –  kakyo Feb 23 '13 at 20:58

On Windows you can use CodeTune, it will give you call graph showing function dependencies

http://www.thewallsoft.com/codetune-documentation/

On GNU/Linux you can use gprof and then this visualizer to create your call graph

http://code.google.com/p/jrfonseca/wiki/XDot#Screenshots

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The linux toolset seems very interesting. It also brought graphviz to me. Didn't know about this tool either. Thanks! –  kakyo Feb 23 '13 at 21:38

Promoted from comment.

Have you tried using valgrind with the callgrind tool?

Valgrind is useful for debugging but the callgrind tool inside valgrind is very useful for profiling and knowing which functions calls which other functions. It comes with a visual tool called kcachegrind that allows you to see as blocks inside other blocks the function calls.

And it's absolutely free.

enter image description here

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