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I have this class, wherein I want to implement IEnumerable to be able to use foreach(). Here is my code by i think i'm not doing it correctly

public class SearchResult : IEnumerable<SearchResult>
{

    string Name { get; set; }
    int Rating { get; set; }

    public IEnumerator<SearchResult> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return( this );
    }
}
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4  
It doesn't really make sense for SearchResult to implement IEnumerable<SearchResult> - a single result isn't a sequence of results. Do you have some special reason to want to make a single result look like a single-element sequence? – Jon Skeet Feb 23 '13 at 17:25
    
Instead of IEnumerable<SearchResult>, how should it be declared? The only relevant concern for me is to be able to implement IEnumerable interface to the SearchResult class. – user2102802 Feb 23 '13 at 17:40
1  
The point is that it's weird to want to use foreach over a single item. Why are you trying to implement this interface? – Jon Skeet Feb 23 '13 at 17:43
    
This makes... 0 sense. – It'sNotALie. Feb 23 '13 at 17:43

You could do:

public IEnumerator<SearchResult> GetEnumerator()
{
    yield return this;
}

However it's unusual for an object like this to implement IEnumerable<T> and return itself in a single-element sequence.

You might want to create a utility method instead:

public static IEnumerable<T> ToSequence<T>(T instance)
{
    reutrn new[] { instance };
}
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I especially like the array variant. yield return is being overused for these simple cases where a list (of any kind) would have been enough, clearer and faster. – usr Feb 23 '13 at 18:29

If you really truly swear that you need to do this:

SearchResult justOne = ... blah ...;
foreach (SearchResult eachOne in justOne) {
   ... blah ...
}

Then you could do this minor modification to your method (use yield return instead of return):

public IEnumerator<SearchResult> GetEnumerator()
{
    yield return( this );
}
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