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Suppose that I have an abstract class

public abstract class Base implements Serializable {
    static final long serialVersionUID = 1;
    public Base(int x) { ... }
    public abstract void baseMethod();
}

and then I dynamically create the class

public class Temp {
    public Base getBase() {
        return new Base(2) {

            static final long serialVersionUID = 1;

            @Override
            public void baseMethod() { .... } 
        };
    }
}

I am able to generate the class Temp from a String dynamically, invoke a new instance, and extract the base object and use it like any other instance extending Base. The problem comes when I serialize. I can serialize the Base base object that I extract from the dynamic Temp class, but then I can't later deserialize in a different session because Temp is no longer on the class path.

Can you guys think of any way around this? There has to be a way to get the Base object in question in isolation from the Temp class (which I never care about after I've extracted the Base class from it). The Base object doesn't depend on anything in the Temp class.

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I am able to generate the class Temp from a String dynamically. How are you creating the Temp object from String? –  Vishal K Feb 23 '13 at 18:06
    
What are you using to serialize? –  Stanislav Palatnik Feb 23 '13 at 18:08
    
@VishalK, I am passing a String of the second code block in the OP into some other code that treats it like a .java file and compiles it into a class. I then invoke the class and get what I need. This all works fine, I can use the Base object return by getBase() without issue. –  richard Feb 23 '13 at 18:12
    
@StanislavPalatnik, just Java's serialization interface. –  richard Feb 23 '13 at 18:12
    
You can create a method in Temp class where you deserialize the Base class Object.. in this way you can deserialize the Base class object in any Temp object. –  Vishal K Feb 23 '13 at 18:19
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2 Answers

Try implementing writeReplace on your Temp object so that it writes a Base, and implement readResolve on your Base object so that it creates a Temp that wraps it. See the Serializable contract.

The code would look something like this. Please note that I have not actually tested this, but it should be pretty close.

public class Base implements Serializable {
    // Existing members here

    private Object readResolve() throws ObjectStreamException {
        return new Temp(this);
    }
}

public class Temp implements Serializable {
    Base base;

    public Temp(Base base) {
        this.base = base;
    }

    // Other existing methods here

    private Object writeReplace() throws ObjectStreamException {
        return base;
    }
}

I realize that this introduces a nasty circular dependency between these two classes, but I don't see another great way of doing this, except for an external reader/writer method as others have suggested. The advantage of this approach is it supports writing out a Temp as part of a larger object graph.

share|improve this answer
    
Haha, this is a little above my head, I will have to do some research... –  richard Feb 23 '13 at 18:28
    
Hi Eric Galluzzo. I am having trouble figuring out how to implement what you've suggested (a bit above my paygrade as a humble economist). I was wondering if it wasn't too much trouble if you could be a bit more specific in what you had in mind, –  richard Feb 24 '13 at 19:29
    
Just added a code sample, hope that helps! –  Eric Galluzzo Feb 25 '13 at 15:58
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Well First of all Richard this is really the first time I am seeing this peculiar case thanks for bringing it out ;) Here I have developed some way out to solve your problem . I hope this might be helpful for you.:

import java.io.*;
abstract class Base implements Serializable
{
    protected int x ;
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
    public Base(int x) { this.x = x; }
    public abstract void baseMethod();
}
class Temp implements Serializable
{
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 2L;//Make Temp serializable also.
    public Base getBase(int i) 
    {
        Base base = new Base(i)
        {
            static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
            @Override
            public void baseMethod() { System.out.println(x); } 
        };
        return base;
    }
}
public class ReadWriteBaseObject 
{
    public static Base createBaseObject(int i)
    {
        Temp temp = new Temp();//You might be creating your Temp object here Dynamically..
        Base base = temp.getBase(i);
        return base;
    }
    public static Base read()
    {
        ObjectInputStream oin = null;
        try
        {
            FileInputStream fin = new FileInputStream("BASE.ser");
            oin = new ObjectInputStream(fin);
            Base base = (Base)oin.readObject();
            return base;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            ex.printStackTrace();
            return null;
        }
        finally
        {
            if (oin!=null)
            {
                try
                {
                    oin.close();
                }
                catch (Exception ex){}
            }
        }
    }
    public static void write(Base base)
    {
        if (base == null)
        {
            System.out.println("Can't write null");
            return;
        }
        ObjectOutputStream os = null;
        try
        {
            FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream("BASE.ser");
            os = new ObjectOutputStream(fos);
            os.writeObject(base);
            System.out.println("Wrote to file");
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
        finally
        {
            if (os!=null)
            {
                try
                {
                    os.close();
                }
                catch (Exception ex){}
            }
        }
    }
    public static void main(String st[])
    {
        Base base = createBaseObject(45);
        write(base);
        Base obj = read();
        obj.baseMethod();
    }
}

EDIT
Although anonymous class instances, can be serialized successfully but still it is strongly discouraged by Java due to several complication. Here is what the official site of java states:

Note - Serialization of inner classes (i.e., nested classes that are not static member classes), including local and anonymous classes, is strongly discouraged for several reasons. Because inner classes declared in non-static contexts contain implicit non-transient references to enclosing class instances, serializing such an inner class instance will result in serialization of its associated outer class instance as well. Synthetic fields generated by javac (or other JavaTM compilers) to implement inner classes are implementation dependent and may vary between compilers; differences in such fields can disrupt compatibility as well as result in
conflicting default serialVersionUID values. The names assigned to local and anonymous inner classes are also implementation dependent and may differ between compilers. Since inner classes cannot declare static members other than compile-time constant fields, they cannot use the serialPersistentFields mechanism to designate serializable fields. Finally, because inner classes associated with outer instances do not have zero-argument constructors (constructors of such inner classes implicitly accept the enclosing instance as a prepended parameter), they cannot implement Externalizable. None of the issues listed above, however, apply to static member classes.

To know more about Serialization in java you can watch here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks VishalK - Correct me if I am wrong, but wouldn't this require Temp to be on the classpath in later sessions when I try to deserialize? –  richard Feb 23 '13 at 19:12
    
@richard Yes you are right..!! There must be some way out . –  Vishal K Feb 23 '13 at 19:41
    
VishalK - well, thanks anyway! –  richard Feb 24 '13 at 18:50
    
@richard can't you use concrete class of Base? –  Vishal K Feb 24 '13 at 19:02
    
What do you mean? For certain reasons Base has to remain and abstract class. –  richard Feb 24 '13 at 19:15
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