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I was just experimenting with some recursion and noticed something that confused me. Let me illustrate with some code examples:

function loop(x) {
  if (x >= 10) 
    return x;
  loop(x + 1); // the recursive call
}
loop(0);

The call above returns undefined. If I change it to

function loop(x) {
  if (x >= 10) 
    return x;
  return loop(x + 1); // the recursive call
}
loop(0);

then it returns 10 correctly.

Why does this happen? How does the return clause affect the stack?

PS: Similar question

EDIT: Here's a quick image outlining what I've understood. (I have absolutely no paint-fu.) Is it right? If not, where have I gone wrong?

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No implicit "last statement returns" in JavaScript like you see in other languages. –  the system Feb 23 '13 at 18:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you don't return from a Javascript function there is an implicit "return undefined" in the end.

function loop(x) {
  if (x >= 10)
    return x;
  loop(x + 1); // the recursive call
  return undefined;
}

As you can see, te recursive call is being called and having its return value ignored. This is just like what happens when you call a function like console.log - the function gets called and runs any side-effects but you discard the return value in the end.

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I do know about the return undefined bit but my problem is that I am having a hard time visualizing it. What does the call stack look like in both cases? thank you for the reply! :) –  zeusdeux Feb 23 '13 at 19:02
    
@zeusdeux: The call stack is the same. The only difference is that in one case the step after the loop(i+1) call is to get its value and re-return it up one more level and in the other case after the loop call you ignore its value and return undefined instead. That said, I personally recommend not focusing about the "call stack" and trying to have a more declarative view of things. (For example, in some languages there is no call stack since the recursive call at tail position gets optimized into a while loop) –  hugomg Feb 23 '13 at 19:25
    
that makes sense. I have edited the question and added an image with the actual code in question and my understanding of the execution. Is my understanding of it correct? –  zeusdeux Feb 23 '13 at 19:36
    
@zeusdeux: yep, thats right –  hugomg Feb 23 '13 at 22:44

When using the function without the second return statement, the function yields no value to the callee per definition in JavaScript returns undefined.

So using the first definition and for example loop(9):

  1. 0 < 10, so we don't execute the if-clause body, but just call loop(10).
  2. loop(10) returns 10, but we never use this value.
  3. the function loop ends and, as no other value was returned, it returns undefined.
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A function only returns the value to its immediate caller. Since in case of loop(0), the if condition is not fulfilled, return x; is not executed and the function has no other return statement, it does not return anything.

If you'd call it with loop(10) it would fulfill the condition and return 10.

In the second case, return loop(x + 1); causes loop to return whatever the other call to loop returns.

Maybe it's easier to understand with a non-recursive example:

function bar() {
    return 42;
}

function foo1() {
    bar();
}

function foo2() {
    return bar();
}

//
foo1(); // undefined
foo2(); // 42

foo1 calls bar, but it does not do anything with the return value. Since there is no return statement inside foo, the function does not return anything.

foo2 on the other hand returns the return value of bar.

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function count_to_3 (x) {
    x = x || 0;
    if (x === 3) { return x; }
    return count_to_3(x + 1);
}

count_to_3();

This is the same as saying something like this:

function add_1 (x) { return x + 1; }

function count_to_3 () {
    var x = 0;
    x = add_1( add_1( add_1(x) ) );

    return x;
}

count_to_3();

Each of the add_1 functions are doing their job and returning their value. The inner function gets called first -- it adds 1 to x (starting at 0), and returns its value into the next add_1, which adds one and returns it into the next add_1.

...but if you don't return the value, nothings going to happen.

With recursion, it's the same idea.

You're returning the return value of the function you're calling.

You don't need to do this.
Sometimes, recursion is about going through a tree and modifying children -- like changing every second DOM node to red, and changing the first child of every parent node blue...

There's no return value that you need there.
You just need to set up your checks, so that you don't try to recurse into infinity or end up trying to modify properties of things that don't exist.

But for cash registers or for loops where you DO want to know if a value exists, then what you're doing is the same as saying return add_1( add_1( add_1(0) ) );, assuming that add_1 returns its value.

Any function which doesn't have a return statement will return undefined (unless it's called with new, but then you get a new object, and that doesn't help you, either).

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If x<10 the loop function doesn't return any value, that' why return loop(x + 1); gives you "undefined". As soon as you reach 10, the return x; statement kicks off and you get your returned value.

The fact that you use it as a recursive function doesn't make any difference here.

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The order in which this recursive call will evaluate will be from the last call down. The function that gets evaluated first is the loop(10) which returns a value of 10. The next will be loop(9) and so on. Think about what loop(9) will look like when it is called:

loop(9) {
    if (x >= 10) 
        return x;
    10
}

loop(9) will return undefined. loop(8) will as well... and so on.

Conversely, if you return the value of the recursive call it would look like this:

loop(9) {
    if (x >= 10) 
        return x;
    return 10
}

and by the time your initial function call gets executed it will look like this:

loop(0) {
    if (x >= 10) 
        return x;
    return 10
}

I created a jsfiddle to demonstrated the point: http://jsfiddle.net/TSnxp/

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