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I am new to Haskell and I am trying to perform some recursive function on a list, and after the recursion is done, I would like to access the output list from the recursion to perform an additional operation.

For example, the function below, takes in a value to keep and a list, and it returns a list with only the values to keep, throwing away all the others.

What I would like to do, is understand how I can get access to output list after the recursion took place, so I can continue to operate on it.

Something like:

//recursive function here

//get length of output list from recursive function
length list

My Function

keepAll _ [] = []
keepAll y (x:xs) | x==y = y:keepAll y xs
                 | otherwise = keepAll y xs

Many thanks in advance!

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Aside from function composition for the general case, you can also assign a specific result of keepAll to a variable and work with that value later:

outputList = keepAll 3 [1,2,3,3,3,4,5,3]
print (init outputList)   >> [3,3,3]
print (length outputList) >> 4


If you would like to access the output list of the recursion inside your function, you might want to delegate the recursion to a "helper" function inside, for example:

keepSome y (x:xs) = keepAll y (x:xs)
  where keepAll _ [] = []
        keepAll y (x:xs) | x==y = y:keepAll y xs
                         | otherwise = keepAll y xs

Now you can change the first line so it applies "init" to the result of the recursion, as you suggested:

keepSome y (x:xs) = init $ keepAll y (x:xs)
  where keepAll _ [] = []
        keepAll y (x:xs) | x==y = y:keepAll y xs
                         | otherwise = keepAll y xs

You could also, for example, name the output list of the recursion, "outputList", if it makes it easier for you to work with, and apply init to that:

keepSome y (x:xs) = init outputList
  where outputList = keepAll y (x:xs)
        keepAll _ [] = []
        keepAll y (x:xs) | x==y = y:keepAll y xs
                         | otherwise = keepAll y xs

SAMPLE OUTPUT:
*Main> keepSome 3 [1,2,3,3,3,4,5,3]
[3,3,3]    --init of the inside result, [3,3,3,3]

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+1, Thanks for the reply. This is very helpful. –  AnchovyLegend Feb 23 '13 at 21:59
    
@MiGusta ...cool, you're welcome! –  גלעד ברקן Feb 23 '13 at 22:00
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First, your keepAll is easer written as

keepAll y = filter (y==)

Second, you can apply length or whatever, to the result, like in

length (keepAll 'a' "abrakadabra")

should be 5.


Hence, the general answer to your question "How can I apply f to the result of g" is

(f . g)
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Thanks for the reply. The implementation is not important. I am looking for a general answer, say I wanted to apply function init to the list after recursion. –  AnchovyLegend Feb 23 '13 at 18:22
    
Answered the general question. –  Ingo Feb 23 '13 at 18:24
    
Thanks for the edit, what is the . for? –  AnchovyLegend Feb 23 '13 at 18:25
    
It is the "apply my left argument to the result of application of my right argument" operator. –  Ingo Feb 23 '13 at 18:26
1  
The . operator composes two functions together. so (f . g) x is the same as f (g x) –  Warwick Masson Feb 23 '13 at 18:26
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You're looking for function composition.

The output of one function may be passed as input to another, like so:

f (g x)

Or

(f . g) x

Where the output type of function g is the same type as the input to f.

The (.) operator combines two such functions into a pipeline.

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