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I was reading through Chapter 13 of the C++ Primer Plus book. It had an example that dealt with using inheritance with dynamic memory allocation, copy constructors and overloading the = operator.

The base class, which is called baseDMA has a private pointer-to-char that uses new in the constructor.

class baseDMA
{
private:
   char * label;

...
};

baseDMA::baseDMA(const char * l)
{
    label = new char[std::strlen(l) + 1];
    std::strcpy(label, l);
    ...
}

Now when overloading the = operator, we delete the label pointer because we will be assigning it to a new value and it will point to a new location. If we don't delete it then we will not be able to do so later because the pointer will point to something different now and the old location that was pointed to by this pointer is not deleted and also has nothing pointed to it now (this is how the author explains it in a different chapter)

This is the overloaded = operator for the base class:

baseDMA & baseDMA::operator=(const baseDMA & rs)
{
   if (this == &rs)
      return *this;
   delete [] label;
   label = new char[std::strlen(rs.label) + 1];
   std::strcpy(label, rs.label);
   return *this;
}

Next the author defines a derived class called hasDMA, which also uses new for a pointer-to-char that he he defines as the following:

class hasDMA :public baseDMA
{
private:
    char * style;
    ...
};

hasDMA::hasDMA(const char * s, const char * l)
: baseDMA(l)
{
    style = new char[std::strlen(s) + 1];
    std::strcpy(style, s);
}

Now the part the confuses me a little, is that when the author overloads the = operator for the derived class, he doesn't seem to delete [] style before giving it a new value, just as he did with label from the base class. This is how the author did the overloaded = operator for the derived class:

hasDMA & hasDMA::operator=(const hasDMA & hs)
{
    if (this == &hs)
       return *this;
    baseDMA::operator=(hs); // copy base portion
    //no delete [] style
    style = new char[std::strlen(hs.style) + 1];
    std::strcpy(style, hs.style);
    return *this;
} 

What is the reason for not freeing the memory pointed to by style just as we freed the memory pointed to by label from the base class before assigning it a new value?

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
1  
This is code from a C++ book? Really? I feel that you could ask "what is the reason for...... publishing this" and arrive at no sensible answer. Refer to this instead. And, um, ignore the first entry under "Beginner/Introductory" :/ –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 23 '13 at 19:01
    
I actually like the book as I'm really just a beginner, and the author explains things quite nicely and gives good examples. –  Ali Alamiri Feb 23 '13 at 19:02
2  
Don't use new and delete. –  user142019 Feb 23 '13 at 19:02
    
@Zoidberg but pointers are..... nice :) –  Ali Alamiri Feb 23 '13 at 19:03
1  
No, pointers are not nice. They are evil and must be avoided when possible. See the slides. –  user142019 Feb 23 '13 at 19:06

1 Answer 1

The reason is because the author made a mistake. This is an excellent example of how you should not ever manage your own memory- he should be using std::vector to manage his memory. He didn't, and as a result, his code was very wrong, and that's exactly the way your code is going to go if you imitate him.

In addition, he uses the seriously outdated self-assignment-check no-longer-an-idiom, and no copy-and-swap.

In short, get a new book. This is all bad.

share|improve this answer
1  
We should remove this book from pole position under "Beginner/Introductory" on stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/… if we want to continue proclaiming that c++-faq questions herald from some self-ordained expertry. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 23 '13 at 19:09
3  
@AliAlamiri: These things should be in the introduction. They are not advanced features. Screwing around with your own memory is far more advanced. –  Puppy Feb 23 '13 at 19:09
2  
Is it C++ Primer or C++ Primer Plus? –  user142019 Feb 23 '13 at 19:09
4  
@AliAlamiri: Primer and Primer Plus are very different. Primer Plus is legendarily extremely bad- they're not even from the same author, Primer PLus is written by Bullschildt. You've been duped. –  Puppy Feb 23 '13 at 19:11
5  
I don't understand why you don't just answer the question, but grumble about the book. The grumbling should have been a comment, if at all. "... he should be using std::vector to manage his memory. He didn't, and as a result, his code was very wrong, and that's exactly the way your code is going to go". That's the most funny and sad thing I heard today. Doing your own string for learning purposes is a very good thing. In addition, he uses the seriously outdated self-assignment-check no-longer-an-idiom, and no copy-and-swap. There is nothing wrong with that. The former is not "outdated". –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 23 '13 at 19:20

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