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I want to react when somebody shakes the iPhone. I don't particularly care how they shake it, just that it was waved vigorously about for a split second. Does anyone know how to detect this?

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11 Answers

up vote 217 down vote accepted

In 3.0, there's now an easier way - hook into the new motion events.

The main trick is that you need to have some UIView (not UIViewController) that you want as firstResponder to receive the shake event messages. Here's the code that you can use in any UIView to get shake events:

@implementation ShakingView

- (void)motionEnded:(UIEventSubtype)motion withEvent:(UIEvent *)event
{
    if ( event.subtype == UIEventSubtypeMotionShake )
    {
        // Put in code here to handle shake
    }

    if ( [super respondsToSelector:@selector(motionEnded:withEvent:)] )
        [super motionEnded:motion withEvent:event];
}

- (BOOL)canBecomeFirstResponder
{ return YES; }

@end

You can easily transform any UIView (even system views) into a view that can get the shake event simply by subclassing the view with only these methods (and then selecting this new type instead of the base type in IB, or using it when allocating a view).

In the view controller, you want to set this view to become first responder:

- (void) viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
    [shakeView becomeFirstResponder];
    [super viewWillAppear:animated];
}
- (void) viewWillDisappear:(BOOL)animated
{
    [shakeView resignFirstResponder];
    [super viewWillDisappear:animated];
}

Don't forget that if you have other views that become first responder from user actions (like a search bar or text entry field) you'll also need to restore the shaking view first responder status when the other view resigns!

This method works even if you set applicationSupportsShakeToEdit to NO.

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4  
This didn't quite work for me: I needed to override my controller's viewDidAppear instead of viewWillAppear. I'm not sure why; maybe the view needs to be visible before it can do whatever it does to start receiving the shake events? –  Kristopher Johnson Aug 9 '09 at 0:54
3  
Can you please elaborate why you advise "not view controller"? It works fine for me if I implement the canBecomeFirstResponder -> return YES method in the view controller. Also, I don't have to create a subclass just to handle the shake motion and I have more information in the view controller to handle the shake than I would have in the view. –  0xced Dec 28 '09 at 14:21
1  
This is easier but not necessarily better. If you want to detect a long, continuous shake this approach is not useful as the iPhone likes to fire motionEnded before the shake has actually stopped. So using this approach you get a disjointed series of short shakes instead of one long one. The other answer works much better in this case. –  aroth Apr 13 '11 at 0:56
2  
@Kendall - UIViewControllers implement UIResponder and are in the responder chain. The topmost UIWindow is as well. developer.apple.com/library/ios/DOCUMENTATION/EventHandling/… –  DougW Jun 23 '11 at 14:45
2  
+1 from me...to make it 100.. –  Krishnabhadra Jun 24 '11 at 8:00
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From my Diceshaker application:

// Ensures the shake is strong enough on at least two axes before declaring it a shake.
// "Strong enough" means "greater than a client-supplied threshold" in G's.
static BOOL L0AccelerationIsShaking(UIAcceleration* last, UIAcceleration* current, double threshold) {
	double
		deltaX = fabs(last.x - current.x),
		deltaY = fabs(last.y - current.y),
		deltaZ = fabs(last.z - current.z);

	return
		(deltaX > threshold && deltaY > threshold) ||
		(deltaX > threshold && deltaZ > threshold) ||
		(deltaY > threshold && deltaZ > threshold);
}

@interface L0AppDelegate : NSObject <UIApplicationDelegate> {
	BOOL histeresisExcited;
	UIAcceleration* lastAcceleration;
}

@property(retain) UIAcceleration* lastAcceleration;

@end

@implementation L0AppDelegate

- (void)applicationDidFinishLaunching:(UIApplication *)application {
	[UIAccelerometer sharedAccelerometer].delegate = self;
}

- (void) accelerometer:(UIAccelerometer *)accelerometer didAccelerate:(UIAcceleration *)acceleration {

	if (self.lastAcceleration) {
		if (!histeresisExcited && L0AccelerationIsShaking(self.lastAcceleration, acceleration, 0.7)) {
			histeresisExcited = YES;

			/* SHAKE DETECTED. DO HERE WHAT YOU WANT. */

		} else if (histeresisExcited && !L0AccelerationIsShaking(self.lastAcceleration, acceleration, 0.2)) {
			histeresisExcited = NO;
		}
	}

	self.lastAcceleration = acceleration;
}

// and proper @synthesize and -dealloc boilerplate code

@end

The histeresis prevents the shake event from triggering multiple times until the user stops the shake.

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1  
Great answer. Thank you! –  Stephen Darlington Nov 18 '08 at 10:06
7  
Note I have added an answer below presenting an easier method for 3.0. –  Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Jul 10 '09 at 21:15
2  
What happens if they're shaking it precisely on a particular axis? –  jprete Aug 14 '09 at 14:54
5  
The best answer, because the iOS 3.0 motionBegan and motionEnded events are not very precise or accurate in terms of detecting the exact start and end of a shake. This approach allows you to be as precise as you want. –  aroth Apr 13 '11 at 0:57
2  
UIAccelerometerDelegate accelerometer:didAccelerate: has been deprecated in iOS5. –  Yantao Xie Jan 20 '12 at 10:12
show 4 more comments

I finally made it work using code examples from this Undo/Redo Manager Tutorial.
This is exactly what you need to do:

  • Set the applicationSupportsShakeToEdit property in the App's Delegate:
  • 
        - (void)applicationDidFinishLaunching:(UIApplication *)application {
    
            application.applicationSupportsShakeToEdit = YES;
    
            [window addSubview:viewController.view];
            [window makeKeyAndVisible];
    }
    

  • Add/Override canBecomeFirstResponder, viewDidAppear: and viewWillDisappear: methods in your View Controller:
  • 
    -(BOOL)canBecomeFirstResponder {
        return YES;
    }
    
    -(void)viewDidAppear:(BOOL)animated {
        [super viewDidAppear:animated];
        [self becomeFirstResponder];
    }
    
    - (void)viewWillDisappear:(BOOL)animated {
        [self resignFirstResponder];
        [super viewWillDisappear:animated];
    }
    

  • Add the motionEnded method to your View Controller:
  • 
    - (void)motionEnded:(UIEventSubtype)motion withEvent:(UIEvent *)event
    {
        if (motion == UIEventSubtypeMotionShake)
        {
            // your code
        }
    }
    
    share|improve this answer
    2  
    Worked perfect for me in 3.1.3, thanks! –  Rob S. Apr 10 '10 at 5:36
        
    excellent, worked for me too. (easiest on this page so far). –  norskben May 16 '10 at 14:06
    1  
    Yep, works. Even on iOS 4.2 on the iPad with a UISplitView –  Richard Nov 25 '10 at 20:07
    1  
    Eran, you are D MAN! –  Ohad Regev Jul 25 '11 at 10:57
    10  
    Note, the calls to [self becomeFirstResponder] and -resignFirstResponder are unnecessary. As long as you implement -canBecomeFirstResponder to return YES in your viewController, then the view that initially receives the motionEnded or motionBegan message will pass it up the responder chain, eventually reaching your viewController. –  Joshua J. McKinnon Aug 2 '12 at 5:37
    show 5 more comments

    First, Kendall's July 10th answer is spot-on.

    Now ... I wanted to do something similar (in iPhone OS 3.0+), only in my case I wanted it app-wide so I could alert various parts of the app when a shake occurred. Here's what I ended up doing.

    First, I subclassed UIWindow. This is easy peasy. Create a new class file with an interface such as MotionWindow : UIWindow (feel free to pick your own, natch). Add a method like so:

    - (void)motionEnded:(UIEventSubtype)motion withEvent:(UIEvent *)event {
        if (event.type == UIEventTypeMotion && event.subtype == UIEventSubtypeMotionShake) {
        	[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] postNotificationName:@"DeviceShaken" object:self];
        }
    }
    

    Change @"DeviceShaken" to the notification name of your choice. Save the file.

    Now, if you use a MainWindow.xib (stock Xcode template stuff), go in there and change the class of your Window object from UIWindow to MotionWindow or whatever you called it. Save the xib. If you set up UIWindow programmatically, use your new Window class there instead.

    Now your app is using the specialized UIWindow class. Wherever you want to be told about a shake, sign up for them notifications! Like this:

    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self
    selector:@selector(deviceShaken) name:@"DeviceShaken" object:nil];
    

    To remove yourself as an observer:

    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] removeObserver:self];
    

    I put mine in viewWillAppear: and viewWillDisappear: where View Controllers are concerned. Be sure your response to the shake event knows if it is "already in progress" or not. Otherwise, if the device is shaken twice in succession, you'll have a li'l traffic jam. This way you can ignore other notifications until you're truly done responding to the original notification.

    Also: You may choose to cue off of motionBegan vs. motionEnded. It's up to you. In my case, the effect always needs to take place after the device is at rest (vs. when it starts shaking), so I use motionEnded. Try both and see which one makes more sense ... or detect/notify for both!

    One more (curious?) observation here: Notice there's no sign of first responder management in this code. I've only tried this with Table View Controllers so far and everything seems to work quite nicely together! I can't vouch for other scenarios though.

    Kendall, et. al - can anyone speak to why this might be so for UIWindow subclasses? Is it because the window is at the top of the food chain?

    share|improve this answer
        
    It seems like you might still have to re-set your status as first responder after anything else grabbed it (like editing a text field) but if it works as-is - possibly not. I think you are basically right that by default the main UIWindow gets first responder status, or events always pass through that being the primary container. I'll have to test out this technique a bit myself. –  Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Aug 31 '09 at 2:37
    1  
    That's what's so weird. It works as-is. Hopefully it's not a case of "working in spite of itself" though! Please let me know what you find out in your own testing. –  Joe D'Andrea Sep 2 '09 at 15:54
    1  
    Momeks: If you need the notification to occur once the device is at rest (post-shake), use motionEnded instead of motionBegan. That ought to do it! –  Joe D'Andrea Aug 24 '10 at 14:00
    2  
    I had not looked at GLPaint - brilliant. Thanks Thomas! –  Joe D'Andrea Sep 15 '10 at 20:40
    1  
    @Joe D'Andrea - It works as-is because UIWindow is in the responder chain. If something higher up the chain intercepted and consumed these events, it would not receive them. developer.apple.com/library/ios/DOCUMENTATION/EventHandling/… –  DougW Jun 23 '11 at 14:49
    show 9 more comments

    I came across this post looking for a "shaking" implementation. millenomi's answer worked well for me, although i was looking for something that required a bit more "shaking action" to trigger. I've replaced to Boolean value with an int shakeCount. I also reimplemented the L0AccelerationIsShaking() method in Objective-C. You can tweak the ammount of shaking required by tweaking the ammount added to shakeCount. I'm not sure i've found the optimal values yet, but it seems to be working well so far. Hope this helps someone:

    - (void)accelerometer:(UIAccelerometer *)accelerometer didAccelerate:(UIAcceleration *)acceleration {
        if (self.lastAcceleration) {
        	if ([self AccelerationIsShakingLast:self.lastAcceleration current:acceleration threshold:0.7] && shakeCount >= 9) {
        		//Shaking here, DO stuff.
        		shakeCount = 0;
        	} else if ([self AccelerationIsShakingLast:self.lastAcceleration current:acceleration threshold:0.7]) {
        		shakeCount = shakeCount + 5;
        	}else if (![self AccelerationIsShakingLast:self.lastAcceleration current:acceleration threshold:0.2]) {
        		if (shakeCount > 0) {
        			shakeCount--;
        		}
        	}
        }
        self.lastAcceleration = acceleration;
    }
    
    - (BOOL) AccelerationIsShakingLast:(UIAcceleration *)last current:(UIAcceleration *)current threshold:(double)threshold {
        double
        deltaX = fabs(last.x - current.x),
        deltaY = fabs(last.y - current.y),
        deltaZ = fabs(last.z - current.z);
    
        return
        (deltaX > threshold && deltaY > threshold) ||
        (deltaX > threshold && deltaZ > threshold) ||
        (deltaY > threshold && deltaZ > threshold);
    }
    

    PS: I've set the update interval to 1/15th of a second.

    [[UIAccelerometer sharedAccelerometer] setUpdateInterval:(1.0 / 15)];
    
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    How can i detect the device movement just like as panorama? –  user2526811 Sep 17 '13 at 5:37
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    You need to check the accelerometer via accelerometer:didAccelerate: method which is part of the UIAccelerometerDelegate protocol and check whether the values go over a threshold for the amount of movement needed for a shake.

    There is decent sample code in the accelerometer:didAccelerate: method right at the bottom of AppController.m in the GLPaint example which is available on the iPhone developer site.

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    This is the basic delegate code you need:

    #define kAccelerationThreshold      2.2
    
    #pragma mark -
    #pragma mark UIAccelerometerDelegate Methods
        - (void)accelerometer:(UIAccelerometer *)accelerometer didAccelerate:(UIAcceleration *)acceleration 
        {   
            if (fabsf(acceleration.x) > kAccelerationThreshold || fabsf(acceleration.y) > kAccelerationThreshold || fabsf(acceleration.z) > kAccelerationThreshold) 
                [self myShakeMethodGoesHere];   
        }
    

    Also set the in the appropriate code in the Interface. i.e:

    @interface MyViewController : UIViewController <UIPickerViewDelegate, UIPickerViewDataSource, UIAccelerometerDelegate>

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    How can i detect the device movement just like as panorama? –  user2526811 Sep 17 '13 at 5:39
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    Add Following methods in ViewController.m file, its working properly

        -(BOOL) canBecomeFirstResponder
        {
             /* Here, We want our view (not viewcontroller) as first responder 
             to receive shake event message  */
    
             return YES;
        }
    
        -(void) motionEnded:(UIEventSubtype)motion withEvent:(UIEvent *)event
        {
                if(event.subtype==UIEventSubtypeMotionShake)
                {
                        // Code at shake event
    
                        UIAlertView *alert=[[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"Motion" message:@"Phone Vibrate"delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:@"OK" otherButtonTitles: nil];
                        [alert show];
                        [alert release];
    
                        [self.view setBackgroundColor:[UIColor redColor]];
                 }
        }
        - (void)viewDidAppear:(BOOL)animated
        {
                 [super viewDidAppear:animated];
                 [self becomeFirstResponder];  // View as first responder 
         }
    
    share|improve this answer
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    Sorry to post this as an answer rather than a comment but as you can see I'm new to Stack Overflow and so I'm not yet reputable enough to post comments!

    Anyway I second @cire about making sure to set the first responder status once the view is part of the view hierarchy. So setting first responder status in your view controllers viewDidLoad method won't work for example. And if you're unsure as to whether it is working [view becomeFirstResponder] returns you a boolean that you can test.

    Another point: you can use a view controller to capture the shake event if you don't want to create a UIView subclass unnecessarily. I know it's not that much hassle but still the option is there. Just move the code snippets that Kendall put into the UIView subclass into your controller and send the becomeFirstResponder and resignFirstResponder messages to self instead of the UIView subclass.

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    Just use these three methods to do it

    - (void)motionBegan:(UIEventSubtype)motion withEvent:(UIEvent *)event{
    - (void)motionCancelled:(UIEventSubtype)motion withEvent:(UIEvent *)event{
    - (void)motionEnded:(UIEventSubtype)motion withEvent:(UIEvent *)event{
    

    for details you may check a complete example code over there

    share|improve this answer
        
    code link is dead –  amergin Mar 28 at 13:16
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    protected by Jeff Atwood Jun 7 '10 at 21:52

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