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I have this situation:

for(auto it = vec.rbegin(); it != vec.rend(); ++it)
{
    if(condition(it))
    {
        //Move it at end;
        break;
    }
}

What is the most efficient/elegant way to move *it at the end of vec?

EDIT: *it, not it

EDIT1: Now I use:

auto val = *it; 
vec.erase((++it).base());
vec.push_back(val);

But I don't think is very efficient...

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1  
Why? You are breaking out of the loop, and it will go out of scope anyway. –  Femaref Feb 23 '13 at 19:40
    
Do you want to move *it to the end? –  nneonneo Feb 23 '13 at 19:40
    
@nneonneo Yes, I'll edit the question –  Felics Feb 23 '13 at 19:41
    
So what do you mean: swap *it with vec.last(), or "remove it" so that every element after it goes one place further to the front and then append the element, or what? –  leftaroundabout Feb 23 '13 at 19:48
    
@leftaroundabout I don't want swap, I want the to have the order preserved for the other elements, but to have my element at the end –  Felics Feb 23 '13 at 20:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To move it to the end:

for(auto it = vec.rbegin(); it != vec.rend(); ++it)
{
    if(condition(it))
    {
        auto val = *it;
        vec.erase((++it).base());
        vec.push_back(val);
        break;
    }
}

To swap with the last element:

for(auto it = vec.rbegin(); it != vec.rend(); ++it)
{
    if(condition(it))
    {
        auto it2 = --vec.end();
        auto val = *it;
        *it = *it2;
        *it2 = val;
        break;
    }
}
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And if it becomes invalidated by the call to push_back? –  Benjamin Lindley Feb 23 '13 at 19:50
    
Not really, because the same conditions that would cause it to become invalidated would cause val to become invalidated. –  Benjamin Lindley Feb 23 '13 at 19:52
    
Yes, it will compile. It will give you a reference to the thing that it points to. –  Benjamin Lindley Feb 23 '13 at 19:53
    
@Dukeling it is reverse iterator and erase works on iterators. The code is something like: auto val = *it; vec.erase((++it).base()); vec.push_back(val); but I don't think is very efficient –  Felics Feb 23 '13 at 19:54
    
@Felics Why vec.erase((++it).base()); not vec.erase(it.base());? I doubt it can be more efficient. To remove it from it's current position will take as long as erase takes and push_back takes constant time. –  Dukeling Feb 23 '13 at 20:01

If prefer standard algorithms over manual loops. So I'd use std::find_if.

If you need to preserve the order of the elements, moving to the end can be done using std::rotate:

auto rit = std::find_if(vec.rbegin(), vec.rend(), [](int i){ return i == 6; });
if (rit != vec.rend()) {
    auto it = rit.base();
    std::rotate(it-1, it, vec.end());
}

If you don't need to keep the order, you can use std::iter_swap:

auto it = std::find_if(vec.rbegin(), vec.rend(), [](int i){ return i == 6; });
if (it != vec.rend())
    std::iter_swap(it, vec.rbegin());

Demo

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