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For example, I have the following template function:

template<class IntType = typename boost::uintmax_t>
IntType someFunnyFunc(IntType x, IntType y, IntType z) { ... }

Now I have the following code:

int main() {
    short a=1, b=2, c=3;
    someFunnyFunc(a, b, c);
    return 0;
}

Will all compilers generate the function

boost::uintmax_t someFunnyFunc(boost::uintmax_t x, boost::uintmax_t y, boost::uintmax_t z) { ... }

, because short can be converted to boost::uintmax_t, or will some compilers generate

short someFunnyFunc(short x, short y, short z) {...}

I need this, because my algorithm uses a loop, that is looping more often, when I use a short integer instead of a big one.

You may ask, why I do not simply define boost::uintmax_t someFunnyFunc(boost::uintmax_tx, boost::uintmax_t y, boost::uintmax_tz) { ... } myself and be done with it. I do this, because I want to make it possible to use a custom integer-type, such that bigger integers, that are not directly supported by the plattform, can be used.

Edit: Could this solve my problem:

template<class IntType>
IntType someFunnyFunc(IntType x, IntType y, IntType z) { ... }

boost::uintmax_t someFunnyFunc(boost::uintmax_t x, boost::uintmax_t y, boost::uintmax_t z) {
    return someFunnyFunc<boost::uintmax_t>(x, y, z);
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The compilers won't perform a type conversion. They will generate:

short someFunnyFunc(short x, short y, short z)

To put it simply, compilers choose the "path of least resistance." There's "resistance" in performing a type conversion, but there's no "resistance" in generating a function signature that matches your arguments perfectly.

If there are multiple paths of equal "resistance" you can get an ambiguity (or no matching function) error (which path should the compiler take?). For example, if you tried to pass a short, int, and long, you'll get an error because there's no proper matching signature for what you're trying to do. The compiler cannot deduce the proper type for the function, because there are several possibilities, with none of them being "best."

Edit: No, that won't solve your problem. If you are passing shorts, the compiler will opt for the templated function (and use IntType = short).

You can just do someFunnyFunc<boost::uintmax_t>(short_1, short_2, short_3); if you want to use boost::uintmax_t but pass short arguments. You could also do:

template<class IntType>
IntType someFunnyFunc(IntType x, IntType y, IntType z) { ... }

// If you try to pass shorts, the compiler will opt for this version:
boost::uintmax_t someFunnyFunc(short x, short y, short z) {
    return someFunnyFunc<boost::uintmax_t>(x, y, z);
}

assuming you want to use boost::uintmax_t but still pass shorts.

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