Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Object O extends a trait T1 which has the type C defined.

In T1 I want to manipulate the static data structure stack defined in object O. but the compiler keeps on complaining

type mismatch that found T1.this.C, require O.C

The code is like:

trait T1 {

 case class C(i: Int, s: String)
  def dumbAdd(i: Int, s: String) = {
    O.stack.push(C(i, s))  // type mismatch error goes here.
  }
}

object O extends T1 {

  var stack: Stack[C] = new Stack[C]

}

I am confused... doesn't O know C and should be the same type as the one in T1? What am I missing here? and how can I do what I want?

Update

Based on one suggestion to put C in object T1, but in my real example, the object T1 can't access to the types defined in trait T1. The reduced problem is as below:

trait T1 {

  abstract sealed class S

  case class SC extends S

  def dumbAdd(i: Int, s: String) = {
    O.stack.push(C(i, s))
  }
}

object T1 {

  case class C(i: Int, s: String)

  def tryASC {
    val scc = SC() // Here the compiler says not found value SC
  }
}

object O extends T1 {

  var stack: Stack[C] = new Stack[C]

}
share|improve this question
    
Please add the line&caret of error messages, so we know exactly where the mismatch was found. –  Daniel C. Sobral Feb 23 '13 at 20:30
    
@DanielC.Sobral I updated the post. thanks! –  monica Feb 23 '13 at 20:33

1 Answer 1

Nested classes belong to an instance of their parent class. That is, the types of x and y below are different:

val a = new T1 {}
val b = new T2 {}
val x = new a.C(0, "")
val y = new b.C(0, "")

The type of x is, literally, a.C, and the type of y is b.C.

The problem in your code is that you are referring to C without specifying what's the instance to which that C belongs to, with the end result being that they are all assumed to be from different instances.

Nested classes are useful, but difficult to use due to their very strict semantics.

share|improve this answer
    
Path-dependent types. One solution: put C in an object T1. –  pedrofurla Feb 23 '13 at 20:42
    
@pedrofurla yeah. but it seems that object T1 can't access to the type s (classes) defined in trait T1.... –  monica Feb 23 '13 at 21:55
    
There is no type s defined in you example. –  pedrofurla Feb 23 '13 at 22:01
    
@pedrofurla Sorry.. the s is a typo. I tried to use your technique in my real code example, but I found that types defined in trait can't be accessed in the companion object. –  monica Feb 23 '13 at 22:04
    
Read my comment again. You won't need to access it in the trait because it will be in object. –  pedrofurla Feb 23 '13 at 22:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.