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this question is actually coming from using threads. We know that in perl threads, we have a function called lock, and according to cpan http://perldoc.perl.org/threads/shared.html: lock places a advisory lock on a variable until the lock goes out of scope. OK, what if we write something like this:

1 sub foo{
2   lock($obj) if threads::shared::is_shared($obj); #equivalent to if(threads::shared::is_shared($obj)) {lock($obj);}  ?
3   ... rest of the code
4   ... more code
5 }

so the scope of the lock is from line 2 to line 4 or just line 2? if "if" statement adding a block to it, then lock($obj) maybe just line 2, see my #comments


the question is answered actually, but I want to add some findings:

I found that no matter how you write either:

lock($ojb) if threads::shared::is_shared($obj);

or

if (threads::shared::is_shared($obj)) {
   lock($ojb);
}

the scope of the lock are the same- the whole foo() subroutine.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The if statement modifier doesn't put an implicit block around the statement it applies to. So the scope of the lock (if it is applied) is the whole of the rest of your subroutine.

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Based on the experiment results, I found that no matter how you write either:

lock($ojb) if threads::shared::is_shared($obj);

or

if (threads::shared::is_shared($obj)) {
   lock($ojb);
}

the scope of the lock are the same- the whole foo() subroutine.

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That's not true. lock only blocks until the end of the lexical scope, which in the second case, would be immediately after obtaining a lock. –  ikegami Feb 24 '13 at 8:17

From the very document you linked in the question:

  my $var :shared;
  {
      lock($var);
      # $var is locked from here to the end of the block
      ...
  }
  # $var is now unlocked

So the lock lasts until the end of the block.

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hi what if it is equivalent to if(threads::shared::is_shared($obj )){lock($obj);} then the scope is inside the if. –  Peiti Peter Li Feb 23 '13 at 20:43
    
I see what you're asking now :) Looks like Borodin answered your question. –  Andomar Feb 23 '13 at 20:46
1  
@Andomar: I think you missed the point. The OP wants to know whether the if statement modifier limits the scope of the lock in the same way as the if (CONDITION) BLOCK statement does. –  Borodin Feb 23 '13 at 20:48

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