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I watched this fantastic visualization of a quick sort algorithm: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5nSXTnD1I4

I felt I really understood the principles behind quick sort and, with the help of some guides online, set about creating my own quick sort.
This is what I came up with:

public void quickSort(int[] a, int left, int right) {

    int index = partition(a, left, right);
    if (left < index - 1)
      quickSort(a, left, index);
    if (index < right)
      quickSort(a, index + 1, right);
}

private int partition (int[] a, int left, int right) {
    int i = left - 1;
    int j = right + 1;
    int pivot = a[0];

    while (i < j) {

        i++;

        while (a[i] < pivot)
            i++;

        j--;

        while (a[j] > pivot)
            j--;

        if (i < j)
            swap (a, i, j);
    }
return i;
}   

private void swap (int[] a, int i, int j) {
    int temp = a[i];
    a[i] = a[j];
    a[j] = temp;
}

The values of left and right are the following:

left = 0
right = array size - 1

Unfortunately the output isn't correct. The problem appears to lie in my treatment of the pivot. In the visualization I watched, the instructor physically removed the pivot and left the pointer pointing at nothing. He carried on with the tutorial and when he got to the point where i and j (what I call left and right) both pointed at the same empty spot, he inserted the pivot and carried on.

As I am physically keeping the pivot in place, I am finding it difficult to properly sort it.

In this code, I am working with the input:

4 8 1 6 3 7 2 5

I get the output:

1 3 2 6 8 7 4 5

Once the "4" value (i.e. the pivot) is sorted at the very start of the algorithm, I never resort it, which throws everything off. Additionally, I think there is something wrong with the quickSort method.

Could someone give me a few pointers? Thanks.

Edit: Two edits that were here have been removed as they contained unnecessary and incorrect information. One of them changed the pivot to: (left + right) / 2. This was of course wrong for the reasons explained in the answers below.

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1  
Closing as too localized. –  djechlin Feb 23 '13 at 20:56
2  
@djechlin: I thought it targetted a specific programming algorithm, as per the FAQ. If I'm wrong, could you recommend which Stack Exchange to ask this on? –  Andrew Martin Feb 23 '13 at 20:57
5  
@djechlin he is asking a coding problem showing code. How can that be too localized?? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 23 '13 at 20:58
1  
@djechlin: I would point out that in the FAQ it states: "You should only ask practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face." I don't see where". As already asked, if you know of another Stack Exchange site where I should post this, please do recommend it. –  Andrew Martin Feb 23 '13 at 21:31
1  
@djechlin You got it wrong. It is perfectly alright to ask an actual coding problem on stack overflow. I think perhaps you are thinking of programmers.SE. In any case feel free to ask on Meta to clarify. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 23 '13 at 21:39
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I had to get rid of partition, because you need both i and j. It should look like this:

public void quickSort(int[] a, int left, int right) {

    int i = left; // Was -1 
    int j = right; // Was +1
    int pivot = a[left + (right - left) / 2]; // Pivot is the value of the middle index, not the index itself
    while (i <= j) { // Changed terminating condition
        //   i++;  Not needed
        while (a[i] < pivot) { 
            i++;
        }
        //    j++; Not needed
        while (a[j] > pivot) {
            j--;
        }
        if (i <= j) {  // Changed terminating condition
            swap(a, i, j);
            i++;  // You need to progress the indexes after the swap
            j--;
        }
    }

    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(a));
    if (left < j) {  // Changed condition
        quickSort(a, left, j);
    }
    if (i < right) { 
        quickSort(a, i, right); // was i + 1
    }
}

Output:

[4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 7, 6, 8]
[1, 5, 4, 2, 3, 7, 6, 8]
[1, 3, 2, 4, 5, 7, 6, 8]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 6, 8]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 6, 8]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
share|improve this answer
    
Works perfectly. You sir, are an absolute legend. I'll study the differences between your code and mine and try and learn from it. –  Andrew Martin Feb 23 '13 at 21:49
    
No problem. Comment here if you need any clarifications. –  user000001 Feb 23 '13 at 21:50
add comment

well obviously that you have got your accepted answer. however I would mention that your partition logic could be implemented easier, with only one for (or while) loop, without nest loop either:

int partition(final int[] a, final int left, final int right) {
        // set the last element as pivot
        final int pivot = a[right];
        int i = left - 1, j = left;
        for (; j < right; j++) 
            if (a[j] < pivot) {
                i++;
                swap(a, i, j);
            }       
        // swap a[i+1] and pivot
        swap(a, i + 1, right);
        return i + 1;
    }

and in your quickSort method:

if (left < index)
  quickSort(a, left, index-1);
if (index < right)
  quickSort(a, index + 1, right);

hope it helps

share|improve this answer
    
It all helps. I'll study this and try and learn from it. Thank you –  Andrew Martin Feb 23 '13 at 22:08
    
@AndrewMartin , j = left - it's there –  Dukeling Feb 23 '13 at 22:09
    
@AndrewMartin no I don't need int j, it was declared before the for loop. read the codes, dude. –  Kent Feb 23 '13 at 22:09
    
Apologies - I had NO idea you could declare a for loop like that. Sorry for the silly suggestion and thanks again for your answer. –  Andrew Martin Feb 23 '13 at 22:11
add comment
int pivot = a[0];

should be

int pivot = a[left];

That, with changing swap (a, i, j); to swap (a, i--, j++); and everything appears to work fine.

Why the above change:

The pivot should be the first element in the range, not the first element.

Nor should it be in this middle, as here:

int pivot = a[(left + right) / 2];

It doesn't matter which element you want the pivot to be, the easiest is to always swap the chosen element with the first element, and continue as normal. There may be other ways of doing things, but those would likely be more complicated.

So you can say:

swap(left, (left + right) / 2);
int pivot = a[left];

which is very similar to the above (not identical), just a whole lot easier to deal with.

share|improve this answer
    
Someone else recommended pivot = a[left + (right - left) / 2], which I think meets the median of three rule. However, this is what I really intended to do in the first place, and of course totally got wrong. Thanks for this. –  Andrew Martin Feb 23 '13 at 22:18
    
@AndrewMartin a[left + (right - left) / 2] - this is not median of 3 (not even close). For the median of 3, find the median of the first, middle and last elements, and swap that element with the element in the first position, then continue as normal. –  Dukeling Feb 23 '13 at 22:20
    
Just googled median of three and realised how wrong I was. Thanks –  Andrew Martin Feb 23 '13 at 22:27
add comment

I think the partition method should return j instead of i.

Another problem in your code are your stop conditions :

instead of two separate conditions I'd change it to a single condition :

if (left < right)  {

  do partition & recursive calls

}

The full code :

public void quickSort(int[] a, int left, int right) {
    if (left < right) {
      int index = partition(a, left, right);
      quickSort(a, left, index);
      quickSort(a, index + 1, right);
    }
}

private int partition (int[] a, int left, int right) {
    int i = left - 1;
    int j = right + 1;
    int pivot = a[(left+right)/2];

    while (i < j) {

        i++;

        while (a[i] < pivot)
            i++;

        j--;

        while (a[j] > pivot)
            j--;

        if (i < j)
            swap (a, i, j);
    }
    return j;
}   

private void swap (int[] a, int i, int j) {
    int temp = a[i];
    a[i] = a[j];
    a[j] = temp;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It could need that, but unfortunately that returns a StackOverflow error - likely due to a mistake elsewhere. –  Andrew Martin Feb 23 '13 at 21:37
    
You should apply that change to your original code. Your change in edit2 is wrong.You must change i & j before the loop, since they are initialized to values just outside the range of the array you are partitioning. –  Eran Feb 23 '13 at 21:41
    
I've changed my personal copy back to before edit2 and changed the return int to j - however, it still generates a StackOverflow error –  Andrew Martin Feb 23 '13 at 21:42
    
Do you have a debugger? StackOverflow means the partition method doesn't partition the input (i.e. one of the partitions is empty), which causes an infinite recursion. –  Eran Feb 23 '13 at 21:46
    
Yeah, I'm going through each step now on the Eclipse debugger (using your edits). Just can't figure out how to stop the error! –  Andrew Martin Feb 23 '13 at 21:47
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