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I melted a pandas dataframe for plotting use with ggplot (which often requires long form of dataframes), as follows:

test = pandas.melt(iris, id_vars=["Name"], value_vars=["SepalLength", "SepalWidth"])

This keeps the Name field of the iris dataset in the index, but transforms the columns SepalLength and SepalWidth into long form:

test.ix[0:10]
Out:
           Name     variable  value
0   Iris-setosa  SepalLength    5.1
1   Iris-setosa  SepalLength    4.9
2   Iris-setosa  SepalLength    4.7
3   Iris-setosa  SepalLength    4.6
4   Iris-setosa  SepalLength    5.0
5   Iris-setosa  SepalLength    5.4
6   Iris-setosa  SepalLength    4.6
7   Iris-setosa  SepalLength    5.0
8   Iris-setosa  SepalLength    4.4
9   Iris-setosa  SepalLength    4.9
10  Iris-setosa  SepalLength    5.4

How can I "unmelt" this dataframe back? I want the Name column to be kept, but the values of variable field to be transformed into separate columns. The Name field is not unique, so I don't think it can be used as an index. My impression was that pivot is the right function to do this but it is not right:

test.pivot(columns="variable", values="value")
KeyError: u'no item named '

How could I do this? Also, could I unmelt dataframes where there are multiple columns that are in long form, i.e. multiple columns in test that are like the variable column above? It would mean that the columns will have to accept a list of columns, not a single value, it seems. thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think this situation is ambiguous since the test dataframe doesn't have an index that identifies each unique row. If melt simply stacked the rows with value_vars SepalLength and SepalWidth, then you can manually create an index to pivot on; and it looks like the result ends up the same as the original:

In [15]: test['index'] = range(len(test) / 2) * 2
In [16]: test[:10]
Out[16]: 
          Name     variable  value  index
0  Iris-setosa  SepalLength    5.1      0
1  Iris-setosa  SepalLength    4.9      1
2  Iris-setosa  SepalLength    4.7      2
3  Iris-setosa  SepalLength    4.6      3
4  Iris-setosa  SepalLength    5.0      4
5  Iris-setosa  SepalLength    5.4      5
6  Iris-setosa  SepalLength    4.6      6
7  Iris-setosa  SepalLength    5.0      7
8  Iris-setosa  SepalLength    4.4      8
9  Iris-setosa  SepalLength    4.9      9

In [17]: test[-10:]
Out[17]: 
               Name    variable  value  index
290  Iris-virginica  SepalWidth    3.1    140
291  Iris-virginica  SepalWidth    3.1    141
292  Iris-virginica  SepalWidth    2.7    142
293  Iris-virginica  SepalWidth    3.2    143
294  Iris-virginica  SepalWidth    3.3    144
295  Iris-virginica  SepalWidth    3.0    145
296  Iris-virginica  SepalWidth    2.5    146
297  Iris-virginica  SepalWidth    3.0    147
298  Iris-virginica  SepalWidth    3.4    148
299  Iris-virginica  SepalWidth    3.0    149

In [18]: df = test.pivot(index='index', columns='variable', values='value')
In [19]: df['Name'] = test['Name']
In [20]: df[:10]
Out[20]: 
variable  SepalLength  SepalWidth         Name
index                                         
0                 5.1         3.5  Iris-setosa
1                 4.9         3.0  Iris-setosa
2                 4.7         3.2  Iris-setosa
3                 4.6         3.1  Iris-setosa
4                 5.0         3.6  Iris-setosa
5                 5.4         3.9  Iris-setosa
6                 4.6         3.4  Iris-setosa
7                 5.0         3.4  Iris-setosa
8                 4.4         2.9  Iris-setosa
9                 4.9         3.1  Iris-setosa

In [21]: (iris[["SepalLength", "SepalWidth", "Name"]] == df[["SepalLength", "SepalWidth", "Name"]]).all()
Out[21]: 
SepalLength    True
SepalWidth     True
Name           True
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I'm confused about your index column. First, doesn't test already have a unique index that identifies each row, i.e. the default index? Also, what is the purpose of dividing by 2 before taking the range and then multiplying by two? Why can't you do: test['index'] = list(test.index) or something like that to create an arbitrary unique index for each row? –  user248237dfsf Feb 23 '13 at 23:54
    
len(iris) == 150, len(test) == 300. The original index on test has a unique value for each row in test, but not for each value in the original iris dataframe. My code range(len(test) / 2) * 2 is two lists [0..149] concatenated together, which can be seen in the output from test[-10:] (the original and new indices don't match up). –  Bird Jaguar IV Feb 24 '13 at 2:29
    
test (length 300) is twice as long as the original iris (length 150); the first 150 rows in test only contain the values for SepalLength, and the next 150 only contain values for SepalWidth. So I made an index that goes from [0..149] twice. Does that make sense? –  Bird Jaguar IV Feb 24 '13 at 2:34

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