Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a java.util.Set implementation that does not call an inserted element's hashCode() method?

I have to use some library's class whose hashCode() implementation is ill-behaving: when this hashCode() method is called, it sends an HTTP request....... therefore, putting an instance of that class into a HashSet causes a HTTP request to fire.
I want to reduce interactions with this hashCode() method to a minimum. Therefore, I need a Set implementation that does not exploit its contained element's hashCode() method.

share|improve this question
4  
TreeSet is the way to go. You need a Comparator instead. –  Luiggi Mendoza Feb 23 '13 at 21:57
1  
Or extend the dodgy class and override hashCode(), may save you more headaches in the future... –  Boris the Spider Feb 23 '13 at 21:59
4  
@bmorris591 maybe this class is final and OP can't extend it. Another solution (based on your idea) would be creating a wrapper class for this unknown library class and override the equals and hashCode functions (still, lot of boilerplate code to maintain). –  Luiggi Mendoza Feb 23 '13 at 22:02
    
Ah, good old decorator pattern... Good call. Don't override just cache the outcomes of hashcode. –  Boris the Spider Feb 23 '13 at 22:31

1 Answer 1

Take a look at the documentation of Object.hashCode() method and Set interface.

Using TreeSet< Comparable > :

import java.util.Set;
import java.util.TreeSet;

public class NoHashCode implements Comparable< NoHashCode >{

   final int value;

   public NoHashCode( int val ) {
      this.value = val;
   }

   @Override public int hashCode() {
      throw new IllegalStateException( "This method must not be called" );
   }

   @Override
   public int compareTo( NoHashCode o ) {
      return this.value - o.value;
   }

   public static void main( String[] args ) {
      Set< NoHashCode > set = new TreeSet<>();
      set.add(  new NoHashCode( 1 ));
      set.add(  new NoHashCode( 2 ));
      set.add(  new NoHashCode( 3 ));
      set.add(  new NoHashCode( 1 )); // '1' is already in set
      System.out.println( set.size());// print 3
   }
}

Using TreeSet< T >(comparator) :

import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.Set;
import java.util.TreeSet;

public class NoHashCode {

   final int value;

   public NoHashCode( int val ) {
      this.value = val;
   }

   @Override public int hashCode() {
      throw new IllegalStateException( "This method must not be called" );
   }

   public static void main( String[] args ) {
      Set< NoHashCode > set = new TreeSet<>( new Comparator< NoHashCode >(){
         @Override public int compare( NoHashCode left, NoHashCode right ) {
            return left.value - right.value;
         }});
      set.add(  new NoHashCode( 1 ));
      set.add(  new NoHashCode( 2 ));
      set.add(  new NoHashCode( 3 ));
      set.add(  new NoHashCode( 1 )); // '1' is already in set
      System.out.println( set.size());// print 3
   }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.