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I have a class Child which extends Test. I want to call a function from Test from Child.

I tried this:

class Test
    constructor: ->
        @i = 'hello world'

    f1: -> console.log @i
    f2: -> console.log 'hello'

class Child extends Test
    run: ->
        Test::f1()

hello = new Child()
hello.run()

When I call hello.run(), it calls Test.f1(), but the result is undefined. It's not setting the static variable @i before it's running Test.f1().

If I switch Test::f1() to Test::f2(), it gives me the correct result.

I need to know how should I make Test's constructor run when I create a new Child() so that @i is defined in Test when I run Test::f1() from Child.run().

Thanks! :D

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3 Answers 3

Here's one way of doing it:

class Test
  @i: 'hello world'

  @f1: -> console.log @i
  f2:  -> console.log 'hello'

class Child extends Test
  run: ->
    Test.f1()

hello = new Child()
hello.run()

Notice, the i variable is static, so it doesn't make sense to set it in the constructor. Also, the f1 method is now static as well.

(I'm not an expert with CoffeeScript, so I'm not sure what the :: syntax is needed for.)

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:: is shorthand for .prototype. –  Fraser Harris Jan 29 at 23:54

The constructor is being run when you create a new instance of Child. The problem is the way that you're invoking f1.

You don't want to say Test::f1(). You can just say @f1(), since Child is a subclass of Test. These are different in a very important way: Test::f1() does not set this, so when that function requests this.i, it finds only undefined, because this is set to Window (or something ridiculous like that in the browser, not sure if you're running this in Node). Saying @f1() is the same as saying Test::f1.call(this). This is one of the nice things that CoffeeScript's class system lets you do.

Finally, a pedantic note: there are no static variables in the code you've written. i, as you've written it, is an instance variable. Static variables look like this:

class Test
  @staticVar = 1234

Or like this:

class Test
  # ...

Test.staticVar = 1234

Instance variables look like this:

class Test
  fn: -> 
    @instanceVar = 1234

Or like this:

test = new Test()
test.instanceVar = 1234

Or even like this (for the default value of an instance variable shared among all instances):

Test::instanceVar = 1234

In a similar vein:

When I call hello.run(), it calls Test.f1(), but the result is undefined. It's not setting the static variable @i before it's running Test.f1().

You're never calling Test.f1(); you're calling Test::f1(), which is very different. In the code you've written, there is no Test.f1, only Test.prototype.f1.

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You can use Test::f1.call this.

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