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the issue I'm wondering about may be more of a matter of style or what have you. I have a singleton class in PHP. When I check to see if the object has already been created, I simply do:

if(self::$instance == null)
  self::$instance = new self();

However, I've seen some implementations of the singleton pattern in PHP do !isset:

if(!isset(self::$instance))
  self::$instance = new self();

According to my understanding, there is no functional difference between these two statements. Is one way better than the other? Is one way more professional than the other?

EDIT:

Here is the code for the whole pattern inside my singleton class:

private static $instance = null;

private function __construct() {    }

public static function getInstance() {
    if(self::$instance == null) {
        self::$instance = new self();
    }
        return $instance;
}
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3 Answers

Provided that you have instance defined as a protected/private static variable, they are functionally the same and it does not really matter which one you use.

Personally, I view isset as more in the spirit of PHP and the == NULL as closer to Java, but that is a style issue.

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One of the few pseudo-conventions PHP has... –  Michael Berkowski Feb 23 '13 at 22:23
    
Personally I prefer the null check, but it seems to me sloppy to use == instead of === -- even though again, there will be no functional difference. –  Jon Feb 23 '13 at 22:26
    
@Jon In this case there isn't a difference, but I agree == null rubs me very much the wrong way. That's probably because the loose equality check is no different from the !self::$instance. Of course, !self::$instance is another, equally valid approach. –  cwallenpoole Feb 23 '13 at 22:52
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the first one is bad; if $instance is not exist it will be error!

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it's not bad, he just forgot to show the whole pattern... –  Karoly Horvath Feb 23 '13 at 22:23
    
Well in this case, $instance is defined as null in previous code. Let me show you what I have: private static $instance = null; private function __construct() { } public static function getInstance() { if(self::$instance == null) { self::$instance = new self(); } return $instance; } So do you still recommend !isset ? –  J Johnson Feb 23 '13 at 22:23
    
OK, why you didn't say that? –  user1735111 Feb 23 '13 at 22:41
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Use isset() when you're not sure if the variable is there or not. In your case the variable is there always. Also you could write it like this:

if(is_null(self::$instance))
  self::$instance = new self();

I would write like this:

public static function getInstance() {
    return is_null(self::$instance) ? new self() : self::$instance;
}
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