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So today I was coding an AJAX object.

I created a constructor, ajaxObj:

    function ajaxObj( arg1, arg2, wrapper ) {
             this.form = arg1;
             this.btn  = arg2;
             this.msg  = "Update successful";

             this.url  = "process.php";
             this.wrap = wrapper; // this is the div the callback uses

             this.serial = null; // serialized form for POSTing

             this.callback = function () {
                  var div = document.createElement("div");
                  div.innerHTML = this.msg;
                  div.setAttribute( "id", "desiredID" );
                  this.wrap.appendChild(div);

             }

             this.btn.onclick = initXHR;
    }

There were to be several objects of type ajaxObj instantiated on the given page. I wanted to include the functions that would not change and should be shared on the prototype:

ajaxObj.prototype = {
     constructor: ajaxObj,

     makeXHR: function () { 
               // cross browser XHR code returns XHR obj
     }

     makeSer: function () {
            this.serial = $(this.form).serialize();
     }

     initXHR: function () {
            // this is where shit gets weird!
            this.makeSer(); // makeSer function doesnt exit

            var http = this.makeXHR(); // makeXHR doesn't exist

            http.onreadystatechange = function () {
                     /* this function checked for 
                        http.status / http.readyState
                        and attempted to call this.callback() 
                        which of course didn't exist.

                        I also tried to change instance
                        properties here which did not work */
            }

            http.open( "POST", this.url, true ); /* this.url did not work
                                                     and had to be replaced
                                                     with "process.php"    */
            http.setRequestHeaders("Content-Type","application/x..."); // TL;DT
            http.send( this.serial ) // <--- this works just fine???
     }

I've looked at many of the similar questions and given great time and consideration to this over the past week. I have my code working now, by taking callback out of the constructor as well as by taking makeXHR() and makeSer() off of the prototype and placing them all in global scope.

Despite the fact that I got my code working, to my chagrin, I still don't understand why this.url didn't work inside xhr.open() while this.serial works inside of xhr.send()


Bascally, why does 'this' work in some places of the prototype (such as replacing

ajaxObj.prototype = {
 .............
     initXHR: function () {
         makeSer();
      ....
      http.open( "POST", this.url, true );
      .... 
      http.send( this.serial );
      ....
}

with

ajaxObj.prototype = {
     .............
         initXHR: function () {
             this.serial = $(this.form).serialize();
             ....
             http.open( "POST", "process.php", true );
             .... 
             http.send(this.serial);
    }

.... Please, un-bewilder me. I was under the impression that I had it figured out. Setting that=this inside the constructor seems to not work when I use the var keyword, and obviously(things are not always so obvious with javascript) removing the var keyword sets that equal to values were instantiated with the most recent object instance.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Just glancing over your code I can see that your initXHR function is only called when onclick of your target button fires. If you inspect this within initXHR I'm sure you'll find it is your button.

I think that based on your current class design you will need to use the old

var self = this;

in your constructor, and make your initXHR a privileged function (within your constructor) in order to access it. I've commented the code below to show you what I've added to your ctor.

function ajaxObj( arg1, arg2, wrapper ) {

     // Assign this -> self at the start of the func
     var self = this;

     this.form = arg1;
     this.btn  = arg2;
     this.msg  = "Update successful";

     this.url  = "process.php";
     this.wrap = wrapper;

     this.serial = null;

     this.callback = function () {
          var div = document.createElement("div");
          div.innerHTML = this.msg;
          div.setAttribute( "id", "desiredID" );
          this.wrap.appendChild(div);

     }

     // Make initXHR a privileged function, ie. one that has
     // access to private variables in ctor
     this.initXHR = function () {

         self.url // should be accessible here
     }

     this.btn.onclick = this.initXHR; // Assign it.
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I was sure that I had tried that... Only I had left the initXHR in the Prototype rather than putting it inside of the constructor. This is exactly what i was trying to do. by the way, and completely off topic, I was just checking out Brendan Eich's website, and it looks as though some cool things lie in JavaScript's future :) –  Charles Addis Feb 24 '13 at 2:30
    
I'm glad that helped. I'll have a nosey at his website, cheers. –  Mark Graham Feb 24 '13 at 11:47

Have a look at MDN's introduction to the this keyword. Probably you called the function "wrong", i.e. not on the ajaxObj instance. Show us that invocation.

The reason why this.serial works and this.url does not is that you just explicitly assigned to this.serial right before - though it likely was not a property on the object you expected.

share|improve this answer
    
Your right - and this.serial seems to not work for all the forms on the page (there are 6 of them). MDN is my homepage. I've read a lot about the this keyword, and conducted my own experiments to try and understand it, but I'll give that article another read... –  Charles Addis Feb 23 '13 at 23:14

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