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from itertools import chain


 infiles = [open('{}_example.txt'.format(i+1), 'r') for i in xrange(100)]
   with open('example.txt', 'w') as fout:
      for lines in chain(*infiles):
           fout.write(lines)

I used this but the problem is the first line of the next file joined with the last of the previous file.

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is each lines actually a set of all lines for a file, or is it just one line? –  askewchan Feb 23 '13 at 23:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try adding a newline character

  for lines in chain(*infiles):
       fout.write(lines)
       if not lines.endswith('\n'):
           fout.write('\n')

As suggested by mtth, you could do it file-by-file:

from itertools import chain


infiles = [open('{}_example.txt'.format(i+1), 'r') for i in xrange(100)]
with open('example.txt', 'w') as fout:
    for infile in infiles:
        fout.write(infile.read())
        fout.write('\n')
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i tried that adds a new line in the every existing line of file –  Helen Firs Feb 23 '13 at 23:06
    
@Helen See updated answer –  askewchan Feb 23 '13 at 23:07
2  
Calling endswith at each line will significantly slow down your code. A simple for loop on the file names, adding a \n between each, would be much faster. –  mtth Feb 23 '13 at 23:16
    
from itertools import chain infiles = [open('{}_example.txt'.format(i+1), 'r') for i in xrange(100)] with open('example.txt', 'w') as fout: for lines in chain(*infiles): fout.write(lines) if not lines.endswith('\n'): fout.write('\n') –  Helen Firs Feb 23 '13 at 23:41
    
I tried the above and it worked I believe thank you –  Helen Firs Feb 23 '13 at 23:42

I wouldn’t open all files at once but rather open one at a time. Also you don’t really need to iterate through the lines (making Python normalize and strip newline characters); just read the files as a whole (you could even read/write them as binary to prevent Python from processing them in any way).

fileNames = ['{}_example.txt'.format(i+1) for i in xrange(100)]
with open('example.txt', 'w') as fout:
    for fileName in fileNames:
        with open(fileName, 'r') as fin:
            fout.write(fin.read())
            fout.write('\n') # if you want that
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1  
I agree that this is better code, but I don't think it will fix the problem with the conjoined lines. I suspect that is cause by some (or all) of the input files not having a newline on the last line of the file. To fix it, you can put a fout.write('\n') at the end of the code (though this will not work correctly if some files have newlines and others do not). You could store fin.read() into a variable, then inspect it's last character to see if it's '\n' or not. Or I suppose you could preprocess the files (or change the code that generates them) instead. –  Blckknght Feb 23 '13 at 23:34

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