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I am interested in a iterative algorithm for Fibonacci numbers, so I found the formula on wiki...it looks straight forward so I tried it in Python...it doesn't have a problem compiling and formula looks right...not sure why its giving the wrong output...did I not implement it right ?

def fib (n): 
    if( n == 0):
        return 0
    else:
        x = 0
        y = 1
        for i in range(1,n):
            z = (x + y)
            x = y
            y = z
            return y

for i in range(10):
    print (fib(i))

output

0
None
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
share|improve this question
up vote 30 down vote accepted

The problem is that your return y is within the loop of your function. So after the first iteration, it will already stop and return the first value: 1. Except when n is 0, in which case the function is made to return 0 itself, and in case n is 1, when the for loop will not iterate even once, and no return is being execute (hence the None return value).

To fix this, just move the return y outside of the loop.

Alternative implementation

Following KebertX’s example, here is a solution I would personally make in Python. Of course, if you were to process many Fibonacci values, you might even want to combine those two solutions and create a cache for the numbers.

def f(n):
    a, b = 0, 1
    for i in range(0, n):
        a, b = b, a + b
    return a
share|improve this answer
    
thanks very much! that explains it now – Ris Feb 23 '13 at 23:59
1  
beautiful and elegant – rbp Mar 11 '14 at 17:06
    
public int[] get(int limit) { int[] elements = new int[limit]; if (limit == 0) { return null; } elements[0] = 1; elements[1] = 1; for (int i = 2; i < limit; i++) { elements[i] = elements[i - 2] + elements[i - 1]; } return elements; } Can you verify this one ? – Adelin Jul 19 '15 at 15:52
    
@Adelin What language is that? This is a Python question and that’s not Python code. Consider creating a new question, or ask on codereview.SE for review of your code. That being said, your array size is wrong for limit=1 which will give you an index exception. – poke Jul 19 '15 at 18:51

You are returning a value within a loop, so the function is exiting before the value of y ever gets to be any more than 1.

If I may suggest something shorter, and much more pythonful:

def fibs(n):                                                                                                 
    fibs = [0, 1, 1]                                                                                           
    for f in range(2, n):                                                                                      
        fibs.append(fibs[-1] + fibs[-2])                                                                         
    return fibs[n]

This will do exactly the same thing as your algorithm, but instead of creating three temporary variables, it just adds them into a list, and returns the nth fibonacci number by index.

share|improve this answer
1  
This will take much more memory though as it needs to keep them all in the list (you’d notice it for very large n). Also I don’t think this is the best pythonic solution for this. I think using tuple (un)packing in a simple for loop (see edit to my answer) would be even nicer. – poke Feb 24 '13 at 0:57
    
When you're right you're right! That's much nicer. – KebertX Feb 24 '13 at 1:46
1  
i would go one step further and say that although this solution is iterative, it has the same drawback as the recursive solution in the sense that it doesn't run in constant space. you've just replaced the stackframes with list elements. – rbp Mar 11 '14 at 17:06
    
@KebertX I know this thread is old but why does a,b = b,a+b inside the for loop work and not when you write it like this a=b and b = a+b? i mean a,b = b,a+b is just a = b and b = a+b right? – Halcyon Abraham Ramirez Jun 23 '15 at 3:06

On fib(0), you're returning 0 because:

if (n == 0) {
    return 0;
}

On fib(1), you're returning 1 because:

y = 1
return y

On fig(2), you're returning 1 because:

y = 1
return y

...and so on. As long as return y is inside your loop, the function is ending on the first iteration of your for loop every time.

Here's a good solution that another user came up with: How to write the Fibonacci Sequence in Python

share|improve this answer
    
(wherever those curly braces came from… from __future__ import braces? :P) – poke Feb 24 '13 at 0:13
1  
Haha! Oops. I'm not even going to edit that out. :d – John Hornsby Feb 24 '13 at 0:22

Assuming these values for the fibonacci sequence:

F(0) = 0;

F(1) = 1;

F(2) = 1;

F(3) = 2

For values of N > 2 we'll calculate the fibonacci value with this formula:

F(N) = F(N-1) + F(N-2)

One iterative approach we can take on this is calculating fibonacci from N = 0 to N = Target_N, as we do so we can keep track of the previous results of fibonacci for N-1 and N-2

public int Fibonacci(int N)
{
    // If N is zero return zero
    if(N == 0)
    {
        return 0;
    }

    // If the value of N is one or two return 1
    if( N == 1 || N == 2)
    {
       return 1;
    }

    // Keep track of the fibonacci values for N-1 and N-2
    int N_1 = 1;
    int N_2 = 1;

    // From the bottom-up calculate all the fibonacci values until you 
    // reach the N-1 and N-2 values of the target Fibonacci(N)
    for(int i =3; i < N; i++)
    {
       int temp = N_2;
       N_2 = N_2 + N_1;
       N_1 = temp;
    }

    return N_1 + N_2; 
}
share|improve this answer
def fibiter(n):
    f1=1
    f2=1
    tmp=int()
    for i in range(1,int(n)-1):
        tmp = f1+f2
        f1=f2
        f2=tmp
    return f2

or with parallel assignment:

def fibiter(n):
    f1=1
    f2=1
    for i in range(1,int(n)-1):
        f1,f2=f2,f1+f2
    return f2

print fibiter(4)

share|improve this answer

Import time a,b=0,1 def fibton(n):

if n==1:
    time.clock()
    return 0,time.clock()
elif n==2:
    time.clock()
    return 1,time.clock()
elif n%2==0:
    read="b"
elif n%2==1:
    read="a"
else:
    time.clock()
    for i in range(1,int(n/2)):
        a,b=a+b,a+b
    if read=="b":
        return b,time.clock()
    elif read=="a":
        return.a,time.clock()

sorry if it's wrong, I had to type this on my phone lol. so, this algorithm utilizes a gap in some other peoples', and now it is literally twice as fast, because instead of just setting b equal to a or vice versa and then setting a to a+b, i do it twice with only 2 more characters. i also added speed testing, based off of how my other iterative algorithm went, should be able to go to about the 200,000th fib number in a second.it also returns the length of the number instead of the whole number, which would take forever. so, my other one could go to the second fib number, as indicated by the built in clock: in 10^-6 seconds. well, this thing can do it in about 5^-6. Also, i'm going to get some more advanced algorithms soon and refine them for utmost speed. good day

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