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I'm hoping there is a simple answer to this question, so please be patient with me. If I have a C header file defines TYPE as such:

struct Example {
    char description[EXAMPLE_DESC_SIZE];    
    int val;                          
};

typedef struct Example Example;

# ifndef TYPE
# define TYPE      Example
# define TYPE_SIZE sizeof(Example)
# endif

Then in a .c file, I have a function as follows:

TYPE createExample (int val, char *desc) {
}

which is called from the main as

TYPE newEx;
char desc[EXAMPLE_DESC_SIZE], filename[50], *nlptr;
int val;

newEx = createExample(val, desc);

How do I code createExample so that it returns a TYPE? I've tried the following (and a couple of other unsuccessful attempts):

TYPE createExample (int val, char *desc)
{
    TYPE temp;
    struct Example example;
    example->val = val;
    strcpy(example->description, desc);

    return temp = example;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems to be a simple problem of using a -> instead of a ..

-> are for pointers, so if you had TYPE *temp you'd use ->.

This should work:

TYPE createTask (int val, char *desc)
{
    TYPE temp;
    temp.val = val;
    strcpy(temp.description, desc);
    return temp;
}
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I tried this prior to posting and got the error noted above. Any idea why? –  user2103459 Feb 24 '13 at 0:21
    
@user2103459 You need to change your #define, see edit. –  Dukeling Feb 24 '13 at 0:25
1  
@user2103459 noted where? Can't see any error message. –  junix Feb 24 '13 at 0:26
    
I am unable to change the #define. It's a file I was provided and am working with. The error that I get is 'invalid type argument of '->'. –  user2103459 Feb 24 '13 at 0:32
    
@user2103459 See edit. –  Dukeling Feb 24 '13 at 0:34

As the question changed, I change my answer a bit:

Basically the TYPE definition is correct and the code is too. The only thing that's wrong is the use of the instance of example in createExample: As you are declaring a stack variable, you mustn't use the "->" operator to access fields. You have to use the '.' operator. So the correct access to the field val is through example.val = val. That's what your compiler tells you by

'invalid type argument of '->'.

Still

struct Example {
    char description[EXAMPLE_DESC_SIZE];    
    int val;                          
};

typedef struct Example Example;

can be shortened to

typedef struct Example {
    char description[EXAMPLE_DESC_SIZE];    
    int val;                          
}Example;

And you should consider if it's a good idea to return structs by value as this implies copying them from and to the stack area everytime. Depending on the size of the struct this could blow your stack under some circumstances. Maybe you should think about dynamic allocation and passing around pointers somewhen.

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Note that the question has been amended (and not by me) to make the typedef name into Example. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 24 '13 at 0:32
    
@JonathanLeffler Thanks for the hint. Will rework my answer. –  junix Feb 24 '13 at 0:34
    
Thanks, the only changes I can make are to the createExample function. My attempts to work with the struct have been frustrated. –  user2103459 Feb 24 '13 at 0:36

Counter-question: Why do you want to use the generic name TYPE instead of the specific name Example or struct Example? You would do better to stick with the specific name. All else apart, if you have another header that conditionally defines TYPE, then you end up with very weird effects depending on which header is included first.

Accepting that you want to use TYPE pro tem, your function only needs one variable in it — either temp or example. Either of these would work and make sense:

TYPE createExample(int val, char *desc)
{
    struct Example example;
    example.val = val;
    strcpy(example.description, desc);

    return example;
}

Note the change from -> to .; you're dealing with a local structure, not a pointer to a structure.

TYPE createExample(int val, char *desc)
{
    TYPE temp;
    temp.val = val;
    strcpy(temp.description, desc);

    return temp;
}

Personally, I'd prefer to see:

Example createExample(int val, char *desc)
{
    Example example;
    example.val = val;
    strncpy(example.description, desc, sizeof(example.description)-1);
    example.description[sizeof(example.description)-1] = '\0';
    return example;
}

Notationally, this uses the typedef name Example throughout. If you're going to use struct Example, then don't bother with the typedef.

The other change ensures that the initialization doesn't cause a buffer overflow. Preventing the buffer overflow like that is perhaps a bit exotic for you at this stage, but it is eminently cautious. There are other ways to do it, such as:

size_t len = strlen(desc);
if (len >= sizeof(example.description))
    len = sizeof(example.description) - 1;
memmove(example.description, desc, len);
example.description[len] = '\0';

I would probably use this; there are some counter-intuitive properties to strncpy() that make it less than ideal (notably, it does not guarantee null termination, but it does guarantee overwriting every byte in the target buffer (up to the length specified) even if the source string is much shorter than the target buffer).

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