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Given a table, t:

a     b    c     d      e
1     2    3      4     7   
1     2    3      5     7
3     2    4      6     7
3     2    4      6     8

What SQL query can identify the columns that has one or more instances of varying values associated with each tuple from columns a and b, ?

In table t above, columns d and e would satisfy this criterion but not column c.

For tuples <1,2> and <3,2> that come from columns a and b, column c doesn't have varying values for each tuple.

Column d has one instance of varying values for tuple <1,2> -- values 4 and 5.

Column e also has one instance of varying values for tuple <3,2> -- values 7 and 8.

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Which RDBMS are you using? –  sgeddes Feb 24 '13 at 0:45
    
I am using Oracle –  Hector Saldivar Mar 4 '13 at 18:03

2 Answers 2

Something like this should work for you using CASE, COUNT and GROUP BY:

select 
  a, b,
  case when count(distinct c) > 1 then 'yes' else 'no' end colc,
  case when count(distinct d) > 1 then 'yes' else 'no' end cold,
  case when count(distinct e) > 1 then 'yes' else 'no' end cole
from t
group by a, b

SQL Fiddle Demo

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Slightly indirectly:

SELECT a, b,
       COUNT(DISTINCT c) AS num_c,
       COUNT(DISTINCT d) AS num_d,
       COUNT(DISTINCT e) AS num_e
  FROM t
 GROUP BY a, b;

This yields:

1   2   1   2   1
3   2   1   1   2

If the num_c or num_d or num_e column has a value greater than 1, then there are varying values. You can vary the query to list whether the column is varying for a given value of (a, b) by using a CASE statement like this:

-- v for varying, n for non-varying
SELECT a, b,
       CASE WHEN COUNT(DISTINCT C) > 1 THEN 'v' ELSE 'n' END AS num_c,
       CASE WHEN COUNT(DISTINCT d) > 1 THEN 'v' ELSE 'n' END AS num_d,
       CASE WHEN COUNT(DISTINCT e) > 1 THEN 'v' ELSE 'n' END AS num_e
  FROM t
 GROUP BY a, b;

This yields:

1   2   n   v   n
3   2   n   n   v

If you really want just to know whether any set of values in the given column varies for any values of (a, b) — and not which values of (a, b) it varies for — you can use the query above as a sub-query in the FROM clause and organize things as you want.

SELECT MAX(num_c) AS num_c,
       MAX(num_d) AS num_d,
       MAX(num_e) AS num_e
  FROM (SELECT a, b,
               CASE WHEN COUNT(DISTINCT C) > 1 THEN 'v' ELSE 'n' END AS num_c,
               CASE WHEN COUNT(DISTINCT d) > 1 THEN 'v' ELSE 'n' END AS num_d,
               CASE WHEN COUNT(DISTINCT e) > 1 THEN 'v' ELSE 'n' END AS num_e
          FROM t
         GROUP BY a, b
       );

This relies on v being larger than n; it is easy enough (and convenient enough) for this binary decision, but not necessarily convenient or easy if there are, say, 4 states to map.

This yields:

n   v   v
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Thank you very much! The last query is what I needed. –  Hector Saldivar Mar 4 '13 at 18:16

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