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Write the

function double mylog( double  y);

Which computes the natural logarithm of y when y>0.  Do this by summing the terms of the power series,

mylog( y ) = 2*( x + x^3/3 + x^5/5 + x^7/7 + x^9 /9 + … ) 

Sum the terms up to x^151. Notice that the parameter y is NOT the x of the power series. Before computing the power series, calculate x:

x = (y‐1)/(y+1)

Write the function to be side‐effect free (no I/O, no output, no globals). If y<=0.0 then return 0. (The actual math.h function does something better than this.) For example, for mylog( 3 ), x = 2/5 = .4 mylog( 3 ) = 2*( 0.4 + 0.4^3/3 + 0.4^5/5 + 0.4^7/7 + 0.4^9/9 + … ) ≈ .8473 Your loop can keep a variable xpow that builds up the increasing powers of x so you don’t need a nested loop for that.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

double  mylog(double y)
{
double x = (y-1)/(y+3);
double sum = 1.0;
double xpow=x;

for(int n = 1; n <= 151; n++)
{

if(n%2!=0)
{

sum = sum + xpow/(double)n;
}
xpow = xpow * x;

 }    

 sum *= 2;

 return sum;
 }

 int main()
 {
double num;

printf("Enter Number ");
scanf("%lf", &num);

num = mylog(num);
printf("%lf \n", num);
system("pause");
  }

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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closed as not a real question by Michael Petrotta, Jack Maney, Brian Roach, Eric Postpischil, Graviton Mar 6 '13 at 3:40

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What kind of help are you looking for, specifically? –  Michael Petrotta Feb 24 '13 at 2:38
2  
Oh man, that reads like a textbook/assignment question that's just been C&Ped, and all of that without even adding formatting... –  us2012 Feb 24 '13 at 2:40
    
You should factor out the x's, so your function would be 2*x*(1+ x^2*(1/3 + x^2*(1/5 + x^2*(1/7 + x^2*(1/9 + ...)...), how many decimal places are you expecting if you go to x^151? You'll need more than doubles. –  QuentinUK Feb 24 '13 at 3:14

1 Answer 1

There is fastapprox library which answers this very question and few more in one C header file:

Quoting from it:

static inline float 
fastlog2 (float x)
{
    union { float f; uint32_t i; } vx = { x };
    union { uint32_t i; float f; } mx = { (vx.i & 0x007FFFFF) | 0x3f000000 };
    float y = vx.i;
    y *= 1.1920928955078125e-7f;

    return y - 124.22551499f
             - 1.498030302f * mx.f 
             - 1.72587999f / (0.3520887068f + mx.f);
}

static inline float
fastlog (float x)
{
    return 0.69314718f * fastlog2 (x);
}
share|improve this answer
    
this could be very useful, thanks! –  Josh Petitt Feb 24 '13 at 3:50
    
It also has many SSE versions of the functions. Very useful indeed! –  user2088790 Jun 14 '13 at 21:46

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