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I am working on an assignment in Java, and am encountering a rather unique problem. Essentially, I have two files within my package: A driver file for testing, and then the actual class file. I am wondering how, from the driver/testing file, to call or execute a statement that is two classes deep? (i.e. we have public class Hello, and within this class we have another class declared called public class Goodbye. We want to execute statements within Goodbye.)

Below is my code for both the class declarations and the driver file. The functions I am trying to execute are the InOrder/PostOrder/PreOrder classes. I'm not even sure if using "public void main(String args[])" is the correct way to define this function. If you have another suggestion of a way to define the functions, I am open to suggestions.

Driver File:

package binTreeImprovedTwo;
import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.util.Random;


/**
 * Class TreeTest.
 */
public class TreeTest {

    /**
     * The main method.
     *
     * @param default arguments
     */
    public static void main (String[] args) {
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader (new InputStreamReader(System.in));
        BinTree tree = new BinTree();
        int value;
        String loop = "";
        Random randomNumber = new Random();
        System.out.println("Bulding binary tree...");
        for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++) {
            value = randomNumber.nextInt(100);
            System.out.printf("%d ", value);
            tree.insertNode(tree.root, value);
        }
        while(loop != "quit"){
                System.out.println("\nPlease select a traveral path:");
                System.out.println("(Enter the choice in parenthesis EXACTLY)\n");
                System.out.println("(inorder)Invokes InOrder Traversal");
                System.out.println("(postorder)Invokes PostOrder Traversal");
                System.out.println("(preorder)Invokes PreOrder Traversal");
                System.out.println("(quit)Quits the Program");
                System.out.println("Your choice: ");

                try{
                    loop = br.readLine();
                } catch (IOException ioe) {
                    System.out.println("IO error trying to read your choice!\n");
                    System.exit(1);
                }

                System.out.println("\n");

                if(loop == "inorder"){
                    InOrder.main();     //the calls for executing the statements
                } else if(loop == "postorder"){
                    PostOrder.main();   // ''   
                } else if(loop == "preorder"){
                    PreOrder.main();    // ''
                } else if (loop == "quit");
        }

    }

}

Class declarations:

package binTreeImprovedTwo;

import binTreeImprovedTwo.BinTree.Node;

/**
 * Class BinTree.
 */
public class BinTree {

    /** The root. */
    public Node root = new Node(1111);

    /**
     * The Class Node.
     */
    static class Node{

        /** The left. */
        Node left;

        /** The right. */
        Node right;

        /** The data. */
        int data;

        /**
         * Instantiates a new node.
         *
         * @param newData the new data
         */
        public Node(int newData){
            left = null;
            right = null;
            this.data = newData;
        }
    }

    /**
     * Bin tree.
     */
    public void BinTree(){
    }

    /**
     * Insert node.
     *
     * @param root is the root
     * @param value is the value to be inserted
     */
    public void insertNode(Node root, int value){
        if(root.data == 1111){
            root.data = value;
        } else if(value < root.data){
            if(root.left != null){
                insertNode(root.left, value);
            } else {
                root.left = new Node(value);
                }
        } else if(value > root.data){
            if(root.right != null){
                insertNode(root.right, value);
            } else {
                root.right = new Node(value);
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Super Class traverse.
     *
     */
    public class Traverse{

        public void left(Node root){
            if(root != null){
                left(root.left);
            }
        }   //end left function

        public void print(){
            System.out.println(" " + root.data);
        }   //end of print function

        public void right(Node root){
            if(root != null){
                right(root.right);
            }
        }   //end right function
    }   //end of class traverse

    public class InOrder extends Traverse{
        public void main(String args[]){
            super.left(root);
            super.print();
            super.right(root);
        }       
    }   //end of InOrder class

    public class PostOrder extends Traverse{
        public void main(String args[]){
            super.left(root);
            super.right(root);
            super.print();
        }
    }   //end of PostOrder class

    public class PreOrder extends Traverse{
        public void main(String args[]){
            super.print();
            super.left(root);
            super.right(root);
        }
    }   //end of PreOrder class
}
share|improve this question
2  
Unrelated problem: don't use == to compare Strings since this operator checks to see if one variable references the exact same object as another variable, something that you aren't interested. Instead you want to know if two Strings hold the same chars in the same order, and for that you'd use the String methods equals(...) or equalsIgnoreCase(...). –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 24 '13 at 3:19
    
Oh, that's awesome. I didn't know those functions existed, thank you! :) –  Baelix Feb 24 '13 at 3:22
    
You're quite welcome. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 24 '13 at 3:22
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Looks like you're mixing class definitions with actual objects created in your application. Particularly, if you want to call a Node's method you need to find a Node object in your code. Looking at your code I see that you probably want to call Node methods on the Node instance called root.

All you do is you reference the root node first and then call method:

tree.root.<method>

You haven't defined any public methods on the Node, so I don't know which method name you'd like to use.


I think you need to change your Traverse API like this:

For superclass:

    public abstract static class Traverse {
        public abstract void run(Node node);

        protected void print(Node node) {
            System.out.println(" " + node.data);
        }
    }

For an implementation. I called it AnOrder and leave it to you to decide which order you want.

    public static class AnOrder extends Traverse {
        public void run(Node node) {
            run(node.left);
            run(node.right);
            print(node);
        }
    }

And this is how you call it in your code. When you create:

Traverse traverse = new AnOrder() // or any other XXXOrder based on user input

When you use it:

traverse.run(tree.root);
share|improve this answer
    
Essentially, I'm trying to call InOrder/PostOrder/PreOrder on the specific instance of the tree, which is created at the start of the driver program. –  Baelix Feb 24 '13 at 3:29
    
Then you're doing it all wrong. :) Were you asked to design it from scratch or did you come up with this design yourself? Are you trying to do a custom iterator that prints in specific order? –  ATrubka Feb 24 '13 at 3:32
    
I came up with the design from scratch, by myself. I am, however, required to use inheritance for these three traversal orders. The assignment requires that we "save on copied code" and simply invoke the 3 functions within traverse in 3 different orders to traverse the tree in specific ways. I felt like this was incorrect, but was unsure how to do it correctly. –  Baelix Feb 24 '13 at 3:37
    
Looks like the main problem in your code is different. The main problem is that your Traverse implementations don't actually traverse anything. I assume you're supposed to use recursion to traverse tree and perform a task, which you don't do. –  ATrubka Feb 24 '13 at 3:42
    
Please look at the updated answer. –  ATrubka Feb 24 '13 at 3:54
show 2 more comments

You're asking the wrong question.

I don't normally do this -- I am mostly in favor of answering the question someone asks, but I make exceptions in cases where I think I know the question better than they do.

The idea behind OO programming is to use classes to represent 'objects' in your program; a hint that you may not be doing this is the names for some of your classes -- inorder, postorder, etc. Those are operations, not objects. You CAN organize your code that way, but there are ways that you will likely find easier and will certainly be more in line with the way most other people do it.

At a quick guess, your "BinTree" class could have operations on it with those names; the BinTree class contains the code to represent an object (a binary tree) in your programming problem. You can declare a variable of that type (BinTree tree = new BinTree(); or whatever), fill it up with its nodes, and then call operations on it (tree.inOrder()).

static void main(String[] args) is not the correct way to do what you're doing. It is a special method name; putting it in a class enables the class to be invoked as a java program, with the arguments coming from a command line or equivalent.

So I suggest you try this again -- use static void main() in the driver class; have it create a BinTree object, fill the object with nodes, and then invoke operations on that class.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay. So I'm trying to make the InOrder/PostOrder/PreOrder inherit functions from the Traverse class. (The point of this program is to try and have the 3 functions mentioned use inheritance.) But in this case, what you're saying is that rather than declaring these as classes, simply making them functions within binTree, correct? –  Baelix Feb 24 '13 at 3:32
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