Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to test the speed of two block of memmory, and I did a experiment in a 64 bits machine(4M cache), and XOR two region of memory with 32-bits aligned and 64-bits aligned respectively.I thought the 64-bits aligned region XOR counld much faster than 32-bits aligned region XOR, but the speed of two types of XOR are quiet the same.

code:

void region_xor_w32(   unsigned char *r1,         /* Region 1 */
                       unsigned char *r2,         /* Region 2 */
                       unsigned char *r3,         /* Sum region */
                       int nbytes)       /* Number of bytes in region */
{
    uint32_t *l1;
    uint32_t *l2;
    uint32_t *l3;
    uint32_t *ltop;
    unsigned char *ctop;

    ctop = r1 + nbytes;
    ltop = (uint32_t *) ctop;
    l1 = (uint32_t *) r1;
    l2 = (uint32_t *) r2;
    l3 = (uint32_t *) r3;

    while (l1 < ltop) {
        *l3 = ((*l1)  ^ (*l2));
        l1++;
        l2++;
        l3++;
    }
}

void region_xor_w64(   unsigned char *r1,         /* Region 1 */
                       unsigned char *r2,         /* Region 2 */
                       unsigned char *r3,         /* Sum region */
                       int nbytes)       /* Number of bytes in region */
{
    uint64_t *l1;
    uint64_t *l2;
    uint64_t *l3;
    uint64_t *ltop;
    unsigned char *ctop;

    ctop = r1 + nbytes;
    ltop = (uint64_t *) ctop;
    l1 = (uint64_t *) r1;
    l2 = (uint64_t *) r2;
    l3 = (uint64_t *) r3;

    while (l1 < ltop) {
        *l3 = ((*l1)  ^ (*l2));
        l1++;
        l2++;
        l3++;
    }
}

Result: speed comparation

share|improve this question
    
From left to right, that's the L1 cache, L2 cache and RAM bus speed you are measuring. –  Hans Passant Feb 24 '13 at 4:05
    
You are right, but the why the speeds of 32-bits aligned and 64-bits aligned in a 64 bits machine are the same? –  foool Feb 24 '13 at 4:38
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe this is due to data starvation. That is, your CPU is so fast and your code is so efficient that your memory subsystem simply can't keep up. Even XORing in a 32-bit aligned way takes less time than fetching data from memory. That's why both 32-bit and 64-bit aligned approaches have the same speed — that of your memory subsystem.

To demonstrate, I've reproduces your experiment, but this time with four different ways of XORing:

  1. non-aligned (i.e. byte-aligned) XORing;
  2. 32-bit aligned XORing;
  3. 64-bit aligned XORing;
  4. 128-bit aligned XORing.

The last one was implemented via _mm_xor_si128(), which is a part of the SSE2 instruction set. Speed of different ways of XORing (optimized binary)

As you can see, switching to 128-bit processing gave no performance boost. Switching to per-byte processing, on the other hand, slowed everything down — that's because in this case memory subsystem still beats CPU.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, did you add compiler optimization '-O2' when you compiled your codes? –  foool Mar 31 '13 at 2:15
    
Yes, I did. BTW, without -O2, 32-bit aligned xor is slower than its 64-bit counterpart (at least that's what I get on my machine). Again, this is because, with suboptimal code, the CPU becomes a bottleneck. –  shakurov Apr 1 '13 at 9:04
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.