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Using MS Visual C++ 2012 version 11.0.51106.01 Update 1:

int x()
{
   return 3;
}

template <typename Fun>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<Fun, int()>::value, int>::type 
MySh(Fun& f)
{ 
   return f();
}

template <typename Fun>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<Fun, int()>::value, int>::type 
MySh1(Fun&& f)
{ 
   return f();
}

template <typename Fun>
int MySh2(Fun&& f)
{ 
   return f();
}

The calling code:

   int res = MySh(x); // compiles and returns 3
   res = MySh1(x); // doesn't compile with error: error C2893: Failed to specialize function template 'std::enable_if<std::is_same<Fun,int(void)>::value,int>::type MySh1(Fun &&)
   res = MySh2(x); // compiles and returns 3

I haven't tried with other compilers (yet) but the intent is to get it to work with Visual C++ 2012 and/or report the compiler bug to Microsoft.

I want to make sure I am not overlooking something trivial and making a dumb mistake. Of course, the sample is just an extract, the real intended use case is more complex and related to: Overloading on callables question

Edit: I was additionally confused by other considerations such as, for ex:

   std::is_same<decltype(x), int()>::value; // true
   std::is_same<decltype(x), int(&)()>::value; //false

and:

template <typename Fun>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<Fun, int(&)()>::value, int>::type 
MySh1(Fun&& f)
{ 
   std::cout << typeid(f).name() << std::endl;   // prints int __cdecl(void)
   return f();
}

Clearly, I was not paying attention to the difference between the type of the parameter and the type of the argument (Fun as opposed to f and x).

share|improve this question
    
About your edit, wouldn't it be better to check the return value of the "callable", like in std::is_same<decltype(std::declval<F>()()), int>::value. This way you wouldn't be bothered with the actual function/functor type (whether it's a reference to function, a pointer to function, a functor, etc), only whether you can or not call it through a given pattern of arguments for a given return type. –  pepper_chico Feb 25 '13 at 6:54
    
@chico - yes, that would be great and it is in line with Yakk proposal. Unfortunately, you guys either run other compilers or am I going nuts here. I certainly can compile both yours and Yakko's versions of the code on LiveWorkspace, using Clang 3.2 or g++ 4.8.0, but not with Visual Studio. –  Tony Feb 25 '13 at 7:02
    
oh ok, I was using clang 3.3... forgot about the msvc thing. –  pepper_chico Feb 25 '13 at 7:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The answer is in the error, replace your declaration with

template <typename Fun>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<Fun, int(&)()>::value, int>::type 
    MySh1(Fun&& f)
{ 
    return f();
}

It happens because of the special treatments standard has for cases with template <typename T> void foo(T&&);

If you pass some arguments to the foo then the following holds(for int as an example):

  • pass lvalue int - T is int&
  • pass lvalue const int - T is const int&
  • pass rvalue int - T is int
  • pass rvalue const int - T is const int

Good article of Scott Meyers may shine more light on it.

share|improve this answer
    
But what is a justification for it, given that: std::is_same<decltype(x), int()>::value returns true? Surely enable_if should be selecting a valid int return type in this context as well? –  Tony Feb 24 '13 at 6:42
    
Justification is simple: "universal references rule" lvalue becomes T& when used with template<class T> fun(T&&) and your x function is lvalue. –  ixSci Feb 24 '13 at 6:45
    
I understand the reference collapsing rules (or so I thought) when applied to 'simple' types but I see that I don't grasp it when the type is the free function. Can you elaborate a bit on the need for & in int(&)() signature? –  Tony Feb 24 '13 at 6:54
    
It is absolutely the same. You have your function x, you can count is as int in terms of "entities" they are no different. Because you have your x function declared then whenever x is participated in others function argument it is lvalue, hence the rules for lvalue are applied. Try to pass &x and you will have to change your signature in enable_if to std::is_same<Fun, int(*)()>. Hope this is clear, more or less –  ixSci Feb 24 '13 at 7:00
    
let me ponder on it a bit. I have another case where change from int() to int(&)() doesn't fix the problem but, instead of std::is_same, in that case I am using third-party utility function posted on SO in the context of similar problem. –  Tony Feb 24 '13 at 7:20

A Fun in that context is a Fun& or a Fun const& or a Fun&& -- the && makes Fun bind to any one of the above 3 references (and maybe Fun const&&? Not sure). && means a magic reference in a type deduction context.

You compared it to a int() instead of a reference or const reference or rvalue reference to same.

I would suggest using std::decay if you don't care what cv and reference types are attached to Fun.

As in

template <typename Fun>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<typename std::decay<Fun>::type, int(*)()>::value, int>::type 

An even better option might be is_convertible

template <typename Fun>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_convertible<Fun, int(*)()>::value, int>::type 

which allows []()->int lambdas to qualify as being a usable Fun. But why stop there?

template <typename Fun>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_convertible<decltype(std::declval<Fun>()()), int>::value>::type 

accept any type Fun such that an instance of Fun, with operator() applied, returns a type that can be converted to int.

You can even go further with one of these:

template <typename Fun>
auto MySh_Alpha(Fun&& f)->decltype( f() )
{ 
  return f();
}

template <typename Fun>
decltype( std::declval<Fun>()() ) MySh_Alpha2(Fun&& f)
{ 
  return f();
}

which are equivalent, and says that MySh_Alpha returns the same type as whatever f was passed in.

share|improve this answer
    
Both you guys have good answers aiming in the same direction so I have trouble deciding which answer to accept. Instead, I will try to test more, polish the question and see if there is any real compiler issue hidden here. –  Tony Feb 24 '13 at 7:29
    
BTW: template <typename Fun> typename std::enable_if<std::is_convertible<Fun, int(*)()>::value, int>::type //typename std::enable_if<std::is_convertible<decltype(std::declval<Fun>()), int>::value>::type Yakk(Fun&& f) { return f(); } works fine for free functions and lambdas, not for std::function, and commented out line with decltype doesn't compile in my version of Visual C++ –  Tony Feb 25 '13 at 0:07
    
The first works for free functions and stateless lambdas. The second you are missing the second () after declval. Unless I made a typo, it should work fine with std::function. –  Yakk Feb 25 '13 at 3:45
    
yeah, need to clean glasses once in a while. There is a typo IMO and it should be: typename std::enable_if<std::is_convertible<decltype(std::declval<Fun>()()), int>::value, int>::type but even that doesn't work. Compiler rejects left side as false right away, printing: error C2039: 'type' : is not a member of 'std::enable_if<_Test,_Ty>' with [ _Test=false, _Ty=int ] –  Tony Feb 25 '13 at 6:41
    
which compiler are you using? I have no issue with your version testing online with clang 3.2, but MSVC, no luck, now or before –  Tony Feb 25 '13 at 7:13

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