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On the wiki for websocket-rails it has the following example using the CanCan gem.

How can this work? With a normal http request a cookie is sent that has a token that identifies the user, but with websockets raw data is sent and there is no cookie sent so how does the server identify who the user is with the CanCan gem?

class AuthorizationController < WebsocketRails::BaseController
  def authorize_channels
    # The channel name will be passed inside the message Hash
    channel = Channel.find_by_name message[:channel]
    if can? :subscribe, channel
      accept_channel current_user
    else
      deny_channel {:message => 'authorization failed!'}
    end
  end
end

EDIT:

In the below when dispatcher is created that should send an http request containing Upgrade: websocket as well as the cookie. But on the next line subscribe_private is not creating the websocket connection so it is not an http request and presumably doesn't have automatic access to the cookie.

// connect to server like normal
var dispatcher = new WebSocketRails('localhost:3000/websocket');

// subscribe to the channel
var private_channel = dispatcher.subscribe_private('channel_name');
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1  
Looking at developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/WebSockets/… , it seems that the behavior the gem author expects isn't reliable or universal. –  bdares Feb 26 '13 at 6:56
    
@bdares what do you mean exactly ? –  MhdSyrwan Mar 26 '13 at 22:00
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+200

Its not exactly raw data, its an upgrade of the http protocol towards a socket that kepts the connection open, if you check the documentation on wikipedia, on the handshake request when the connection is being created, there is a stream of information that is send from the client, and an answer from the server.

So an example of a websocket connection request would be

GET /mychat HTTP/1.1
Host: server.example.com 
Upgrade: websocket
Connection: Upgrade
Sec-WebSocket-Key: x3JJHMbDL1EzLkh9GBhXDw==
Sec-WebSocket-Protocol: chat
Sec-WebSocket-Version: 13
Origin: http://example.com

which is sent over a socket as a stream of bytes, but the same thing happens with a common http request, nevertheless,

If you check the request that is created with rails-websocket, when you run on js the code

var dispatcher = new WebSocketRails('localhost:3000/websocket');

you will see that the request for the connection over the network is

GET /websocket HTTP/1.1
Host: localhost:3000
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10.8; rv:19.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/19.0
Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8
Accept-Language: en-us,es-ar;q=0.7,en;q=0.3
Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
Sec-WebSocket-Version: 13
Origin: http://localhost:3000
Sec-WebSocket-Key: dRpM9EesBFdk3SOH2QL/Tw==
Cookie: __utma=111872281.1938357651.1354053248.1355759500.1357797379.3; __utmz=111872281.1354053248.1.1.utmcsr=(direct)|utmccn=(direct)|utmcmd=(none); hblid=T1PaqE0vcRC9zDYrpFoBo5RD91766581; olfsk=olfsk5917359536568161; remember_admin_user_token=BAhbB1sGaQlJIiIkMmEkMTAkV0VhZzJaeXg3SzZFQWMzVUdPLktaTwY6BkVU--f84238cbbcb767e075117603de67f56a7150eb97; _stack_session=BAh7CEkiD3Nlc3Npb25faWQGOgZFRkkiJTg0NGIwNzZmNWUyZjFiNTMwZDkwMWUyMGFiODMxOGE3BjsAVEkiEF9jc3JmX3Rva2VuBjsARkkiMWxIS1FHUjg1b2pDbjFybFY4RW8yemtzRWtVQUdHY1BxTGxtdzBWOFdBN009BjsARkkiE3VzZXJfcmV0dXJuX3RvBjsARiIZL2hvbWUvcHJpdmF0ZV9hY3Rpb24%3D--e4823c74756cf70af0675323fb752b1f87064f09
Connection: keep-alive, Upgrade
Pragma: no-cache
Cache-Control: no-cache
Upgrade: websocket

So the cookies are being sent, and most important, on your AuthorizationController:

class AuthorizationController < WebsocketRails::BaseController
  def authorize_channels
    # The channel name will be passed inside the message Hash
    channel = Channel.find_by_name message[:channel]
    if can?(:subscribe, channel)
      accept_channel current_user
    else
      deny_channel({:message => 'authorization failed!'})
    end
  end
end

If you put a breakpoint on the authorize_channels method, you will see that you have all the cookies as if it were a common http request.

For more information about what and how a websocket works, you can read the RFC, but the important thing here is that on the handshake when the connection is created, the client sends the cookies along with other information like if it were some kind of http request, the server receive the websocket request, authentify the user by checking the cookies, and it either open the connection which remains open as a socket for full duplex communication, or close the connection because the credentials were invalid.


I'm not sure if I'm understanding your question. The main difference between a common page request, and a web socket, is that a web socket its a socket that users http handshake for starting the connection.

On your code, these lines sends the http request with the cookies, and the server accepts the connection.

// connect to server like normal
var dispatcher = new WebSocketRails('localhost:3000/websocket');

So at this point you have a full duplex socket (which means that either the server or client can sends data over it without conflicts). Any arbitrary data.

Then on the next code:

// subscribe to the channel
var private_channel = dispatcher.subscribe_private('channel_name');

The client is asking the server (over the connection that is alive, over the websocket) to subscribe to a channel that is private.

Now, the main important thing to understand, is that if you get subscribed to a channel, you are not opening a new connection, you will still use the same Websocket where you are asking now to be subscribed to a private channel, and this is the same websocket where you sent the cookies when you started the connection.

Now if by chance you can set a breakpoint on the websocket-rails gem, no the file dispatcher.rb, on the method route(event), you will notice that under the hood, websocket-rails uses faye-websocket-ruby to handle the websocket connection, and that within the requests, you have access to the cookies that were sent on the websocket handshake.

The route will route the request to the websocket-rails controller AuthorizationController, which in most cases it has a code like:

if can?(:subscribe, message[:channel])
  accept_channel current_user
else
  deny_channel({:message => 'authorization failed!'})
end

and because it has access to the helper methods the same a common rails controller, the cancan? method from cancan, will call the current_user helper, and this method will have full access to the cookies.

So the channels is not something that is described on the websocket RFC, the websocket is just a socket that you can use to send any data, and in this case, the public and private channels is just a communication behavior developed by the author of the gem websocket-rails to create channels of communications and broadcasting messages to the different clients.

If you go into the websocket-rails issues, you will notice that there are even requests to create one-way secured channels: https://github.com/DanKnox/websocket-rails/issues/52

So its not like someone can send a stream of subscribe_to_private channel and get access to the channel, before they can even send the stream for subscription, they have to create the websocket connection by the http requests, as described on the rfc, and then, over that websocket connection, they have to send the stream of bytes asking the ruby gem to be subscribed to that channel, and when they do that, on the rails server you have automatically access to the cookies for that websocket that were sent when the connection was created.

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But after the websocket is created with new WebSocketRails('localhost:3000/websocket') what happens when a channel is subscribed to with dispatcher.subscribe_private('channel_name'). The subscribe_private comes after the new WebSocketRails creates the websocket hence subscribe_private can't be an http request and so can't have a cookie. I've edited my post with a more readable example. –  user782220 Mar 1 '13 at 12:36
    
I updated the answer. When subscribe_private is called, it sends a chunk of data over the websocket connection saying "hey, I want to be subscribed to this channel of information", and rails has access to the original http headers at anytime over that websocket. Its not like someone can go and get a subscription without establishing a websocket connection. Its important to understand that channels are not related to websockets, that's just a creation of the ruby author over the websocket, so its a way to manage the broadcasting of messages. –  rorra Mar 2 '13 at 9:53
    
Since Rails is normally getting the cookie on each http request and stateless in-between http requests, I would not expect Rails to be able to hold onto a cookie persistently by default. Does that mean that in order to hold onto the cookie after the WebSocket is created the websocket-rails gem is monkey patching Rails to make it able to hold onto the cookie for WebSocket connections? I would really like to know how the long term saving of the cookie is implemented. Do you know where in the code this is implemented? –  user782220 Mar 2 '13 at 12:20
    
It's implemented in the Faye websocket gem, which is the gem that implements the websocket connection. –  rorra Mar 2 '13 at 19:10
    
Do you know specifically where in the Faye codebase that is implemented? I looked in the code and couldn't find any useful mentions of session or storing the identification of the user in a sesssion. –  user782220 Mar 3 '13 at 1:06
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