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I have two regular expressions. one to match a python style comment, and one to match a file path.

When I try to see if a comment matches the file path expression it throws an error if the comment string is longer than ~15 characters. Otherwise it acts as expected.

how can I modify my regex so that it doesn't have this problem

sample code:

#include <string>
#include "boost/regex.hpp"

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    boost::regex re_comment("\\s*#[^\\r\\n]*");
    boost::regex re_path("\"?([A-Za-z]:)?[\\\\/]?(([^(\\\\/:*?\"<>|\\r\\n)]+[\\\\/]?)+)?\\.[\\w]+\"?");

    string shortComment = " #comment ";
    string longComment  = "#123456789012345678901234567890";
    string myPath       = "C:/this/is.a/path.doc";

    regex_match(shortComment,re_comment);    //evaluates to true
    regex_match(longComment,re_comment);     //evaluates to true

    regex_match(myPath, re_path);             //evaluates to true
    regex_match(shortComment, re_path);       //evaluates to false
    regex.match(longComment, re_path);        //throws error
}

This is the error that gets thrown

terminate called after throwing an instance of
    'boost::exception_detail::clone_impl<boost::exception_detail
            ::error_info_injector<std::runtime_error> >'
what():  The complexity of matching the regular expression exceeded predefined
    bounds.  Try refactoring the regular expression to make each choice made by the
    state machine unambiguous.  This exception is thrown to prevent "eternal" matches
    that take  an indefinite period time to locate.
share|improve this question
    
Can you explain your regex? This "\"?([A-Za-z]:)?[\\\\/]?(([^(\\\\/:*?\"<>|\\r\\n)]+[\\\\/]?)+)?\\.[\\w]+\"?" in particular. I have a feeling that you may not know what you are matching. –  nhahtdh Feb 24 '13 at 7:10
    
Its very possible that you are correct I am new to regex. basically, what i am trying to do is: "? optional quotes ([A-Za-z]: [\/])? optional drive letter [^(\/:*?\"<>|\r\n)]+ file or folder name [\\/]? optional folder seperator \.[\w]+ file extension –  Trump211 Feb 24 '13 at 7:20
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I know it is tempting to always create one huge regex to solve all of the worlds problems, and indeed there may be performance reasons for doing so, but you also have to consider the maintenance nightmare you are creating when you build such a monstrosity. That being said, I propose to break the problem down to manageable parts.

Basically take care of quotes, split the string on dir separators, and regex each part of the path.

#include <string>
#include "boost/regex.hpp"
#include "boost/algorithm/string.hpp"
using namespace std;
using namespace boost;


bool my_path_match(std::string line)
{
    bool ret = true;
    string drive = "([a-zA-Z]\\:)?";
    string pathElem = "(\\w|\\.|\\s)+";
    boost::regex re_pathElem(pathElem);
    boost::regex re_drive("(" + drive + "|" + pathElem + ")");

    vector<string> split_line;
    vector<string>::iterator it;

    if ((line.front() == '"') && (line.back() == '"'))
    {
        line.erase(0, 1); // erase the first character
        line.erase(line.size() - 1); // erase the last character
    }

    split(split_line, line, is_any_of("/\\"));

    if (regex_match(split_line[0], re_drive) == false)
    {
        ret = false;
    }
    else
    {
        for (it = (split_line.begin() + 1); it != split_line.end(); it++)
        {
            if (regex_match(*it, re_pathElem) == false)
            {
                ret = false;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    return ret;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    boost::regex re_comment("^.*#.*$");

    string shortComment = " #comment ";
    string longComment  = "#123456789012345678901234567890";
    vector<string> testpaths;
    vector<string> paths;
    vector<string>::iterator it;
    testpaths.push_back("C:/this/is.a/path.doc");
    testpaths.push_back("C:/this/is also .a/path.doc");
    testpaths.push_back("/this/is also .a/path.doc");
    testpaths.push_back("./this/is also .a/path.doc");
    testpaths.push_back("this/is also .a/path.doc");
    testpaths.push_back("this/is 1 /path.doc");

    bool ret;
    ret = regex_match(shortComment, re_comment);    //evaluates to true
    cout<<"should be true = "<<ret<<endl;
    ret = regex_match(longComment, re_comment);     //evaluates to true
    cout<<"should be true = "<<ret<<endl;

    string quotes;
    for (it = testpaths.begin(); it != testpaths.end(); it++)
    {
        paths.push_back(*it);
        quotes = "\"" + *it + "\""; // test quoted paths
        paths.push_back(quotes);
        std::replace(it->begin(), it->end(), '/', '\\'); // test backslash paths
        std::replace(quotes.begin(), quotes.end(), '/', '\\'); // test backslash quoted paths
        paths.push_back(*it);
        paths.push_back(quotes);
    }

    for (it = paths.begin(); it != paths.end(); it++)
    {
        ret = my_path_match(*it);             //evaluates to true
        cout<<"should be true = "<<ret<<"\t"<<*it<<endl;
    }

    ret = my_path_match(shortComment);       //evaluates to false
    cout<<"should be false = "<<ret<<endl;
    ret = my_path_match(longComment);        //evaluates to false
    cout<<"should be false = "<<ret<<endl;
}

Yes, it will (probably) be slower than just a single regex BUT it will work, it doesn't throw errors on the python comment lines, and if you find a path/comment that fails, you should be able to figure out what is wrong and fix it (i.e. it is maintainable).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I didn't even think to split it up. If i am interpretting this correctly, string pathElem = "(\\w|\\.|\\s)+"; will match to a set of one or more word characters or . or whitespace. what do the '|' do? I would have thought (\w\.\s)+ would do the same? –  Trump211 Feb 25 '13 at 0:02
    
The pipe is an or operator. I believe your (\w\.\s)+ will match a word followed by a period followed by a space. Repeated one or more times. In other words yours will match "word. " but not "word" –  Chris Desjardins Feb 25 '13 at 7:03
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