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I'm trying to adapt a bit of code for a doubly-linked list to be included and used in my mysh.cpp file, and I'm getting

error: aggregate ‘linked_list list’ has incomplete type and cannot be defined

on compile. readcommand.cpp compiles just fine, so I'm just trying to figure out what needs to be changed either in the header file or cpp files to get it running smoothly for mysh.

Here are the relevant portions of the files used:

mysh.cpp

#include "readcommand.h"

using namespace std;

int main (int argc, char** argv) {
  readcommand read;
  linked_list list; // THIS is the line that's causing the error

  ...
}

readcommand.h

#ifndef READCOMMAND_H
#define READCOMMAND_H

#include <cstdio>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
#include <cstdlib>

class readcommand {

  public:

  // Struct Definitions
  typedef struct node node_t;
  typedef struct linked_list linked_list_t;

  struct node;
  struct linked_list;

...
};

#endif

readcommand.cpp

#include "readcommand.h"

using namespace std;

struct node {
  const char *word;
  node *prev;
  node *next;
};

struct linked_list {
  node *first;
  node *last;
};

...

It's been a while since I've used headers in c++, or the language in general. I've tried changing the line in question to

read.linked_list list;

and

read.linked_list list = new linked_list;

and the like, but it just changes the error to things like

error: ‘class readcommand’ has no member named ‘linked_list’

and

error: invalid use of ‘struct readcommand::linked_list’

Thanks ahead of time.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to put these...

struct node {
  const char *word;
  node *prev;
  node *next;
};

struct linked_list {
  node *first;
  node *last;
};

...someplace where the compiler will see them before they are used in class readcommand. Probably the easiest thing to do would be to put them in readcommand.h before class readcommand. The problem is that node and linked_list are being used in your class readcommand but the compiler doesn't know what they are at that point in the compilation.

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I'm now getting no matching function for call to readcommand::initialize(linked_list*) on code such as read.initialize(& list); Why is this? The structure definitions and declarations have been moved to the top of the header, and list is created on the line linked_list list; in mysh.cpp. –  LeMazing Feb 26 '13 at 0:26
    
That's a separate error, and there isn't enough information above to know what you have. Do you have a function initialize(linked_list*) in your class definition for readcommand? i.e. in the header file? The function declaration is necessary in addition to the structure changes you just made. –  wilsonmichaelpatrick Feb 26 '13 at 1:32
    
Gotcha. I'll go ahead and post another question with the relevant functions. –  LeMazing Feb 27 '13 at 22:01

The struct/class definition (and not just declaration) needs to be visible when you

  1. dereference a pointer to that struct/class
  2. create an object of that struct/class

The compiler needs to know the size of the object and the location of its fields.

That is why you may want to put the definitions of node and linked_list into the .h file. Typically, you put into .cpp only the definitions of member functions.

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You have the definition of linked_list in the cpp file... so if you include the .h file, the compiler doesn't see that struct's definition.

Move the struct's definition to the header file.

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In readcommend.h

linked_list is a member of class readcommand, you can access it through readcommand object or move linked_list to readcommand.h insead if readcommand.cpp so compiler know "what is it"

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