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In the following snippet can anyone please explain how is reg defined ?

str = "This is the first line.\n" + 
      "This is the second line.\n" + 
      "This the third line.\n";
reg = /^.*$/gm;

var mtch = str.match(reg);

The need is to split the three sentences that are on a separate line but I don't understand the pattern defined to split it.

It says (I guess so !) the string should start and with . and . can occur multiple times. What is the need to put * when we are actually putting the global flag ?

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this fiddle shows it in action: jsfiddle.net/Yxzr4 –  Bastian Rang Feb 24 '13 at 11:43

4 Answers 4

Global, multiline match

The g modifier simply means return all matching strings

The m modifier is best explained by the docs:

Treat beginning and end characters (^ and $) as working over multiple lines (i.e., match the beginning or end of each line (delimited by \n or \r), not only the very beginning or end of the whole input string)

As such, the regex in the question matches all strings between newline characters.

str = "This is the first line.\n" + 
  "This is the second line.\n" + 
  "This the third line.\n";

str.match(/^.*$/gm)
//["This is the first line.", "This is the second line.", "This the third line.", ""]

m modifier not required

The start and end anchors aren't actually necessary; as such a simpler, almost-equivalent, regex would be:

str.match(/.+/g)
//["This is the first line.", "This is the second line.", "This the third line."]

In this case the .+ will match any string of one or more characters excluding newlines. Matches in regexes are greedy by default and will expand to match the most possible, as such it will split the string into lines. Note that there are no empty strings in the response.

This doesn't need a regex

For the purpose of what this regex looks to be doing, it's better to not user a regex at all:

str.split("\n");
//["This is the first line.", "This is the second line.", "This the third line.", ""]
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The "m" flag tells javascript to have ^ and $ anchors match at beginning and end of line breaks. So, this regex matches all cases ("g" flag) that have any character 0 or more times, contained in a line.

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+1. To clarify this answer in the context of OP's specific query re *, the * is the "0 or more times" quantifier for the "any character" . –  Sepster Feb 24 '13 at 11:47
    
I don't understand the use of m flag.What happens if I don't use it ? Please elaborate –  saplingPro Feb 24 '13 at 14:34

What is the need to put * when we are actually putting the global flag ?

The * is part of the pattern (used for the match), the g is a modifier which means "all the result, not only the first one".

/^.$/m; would return a line with only one character (the first one found)

/^.*$/m; would return a line (the first one found)

/^.$/gm; would return every line with only one character

/^.*$/gm; returns every line

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1  
I like the format of the answer, although "/^.$/m; would return the first character found" is misleading and would be better as something like "/^.$/m would return a line with only one character". –  MikeM Feb 24 '13 at 12:48
    
My bad. My version was wrong indeed. Thank you. –  boumbh Feb 25 '13 at 22:21

dot(.) means any character. * means 0 or more. The 'm' modifier is multi line.

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you didn't answer one of his 2 questions. 1. what splits the string by line break / 2. why use * when there is the global flag. –  Bastian Rang Feb 24 '13 at 11:38
    
But you did correct the OP's misunderstanding of . (So +1 from me as that bit is 'useful'). But this really should have been a comment IMHO. –  Sepster Feb 24 '13 at 11:44

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