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Lets say I have this structure ( no classes , no Id's): - it's a location finding question

The d[0,1,2] are pure divs . no class no id.

div (d0) wrapps a repeating structure like :

enter image description here

And let's say I have $(this) as the first d1

Is there any traverse function , method , solution for getting the other 2 d1 ? ( or all d1's.it doesn't matter..)

I'll prase it with words :

I'm $(this)=d1. I have a parent ( which is d2 , can be more ....this is just for my sample) which has a parent (d3 ) and hence, I have 2 more exact elements like me.

how can I get them ? JSBIN

edit

Maybe I wasn't clear but I don't have to know the structure. I just have $(this) and it should find by itself other twins relative to d0 ( as same as its position)

so it should be something like :

function getLikeMyself(objWhichIsThis , contextDivElement)
{
}

execute : getLikeMyself(theDivWhishIsThis, divElemtnWhichIs_d0)
share|improve this question
    
You should say: I may have X number of parents. –  Ja͢ck Feb 24 '13 at 11:57
    
@Jack it doesnt matter cause I'm supplying the context div which is contextDivElement so me, as a child of child of... should seek my position according to this contextDivElement. ( and ofcourse find twins like me) –  Royi Namir Feb 24 '13 at 11:59
    
No, first you say "I have parent d2 and d3" and later you say you don't have to know the structure, i.e. there may be more parents (or less). –  Ja͢ck Feb 24 '13 at 12:05
    
@Jack you are right. I'll enhance it.(edit : added it in the quote). –  Royi Namir Feb 24 '13 at 12:06
    
How do you determine the starting $(this) object? Or should all elements try and find all other elements that are like themselves? –  David Thomas Feb 24 '13 at 12:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is my new try, a .me() method that will return you the selector of the current element built up until the body.

$.fn.me = function(){
  return this.first().parentsUntil("body").andSelf().map(function(){
    return this.tagName;
  }).get().join(">");
};

Usage:

var selector = $(this).me();
var $twins = $(selector);

See it here.


An alternative version that accepts a root element as an argument:

$.fn.me = function(root){
  return this.first().parentsUntil(root).andSelf().map(function(){
    return this.tagName;
  }).get().join(">");
};

Usage:

var selector = $(this).me("#root");
var $twins = $(selector, "#root");

See it here.


A third version that keeps the relative position of the descendants of the topmost element under the root element. For example, it will return DIV>DIV:nth-child(1)>SPAN:nth-child(2) instead of a generic DIV>DIV>SPAN selector.

$.fn.me = function(root){
  return this.first().parentsUntil(root).andSelf().map(function(){
    var eq = i ? ":nth-child(" + ($(this).index() + 1) + ")" : "";
    return this.tagName + eq;
  }).get().join(">");
};

Usage:

var selector = $(this).me("#root");
var $twins = $(selector, "#root");
share|improve this answer
    
maybe I wasn't clear but I dont have to know the structure(otherwise it would be pretty easy). I just have $(this) and it should find by itself other twins relative to d0 –  Royi Namir Feb 24 '13 at 11:51
    
@RoyiNamir, you put it well, you need to do it by yourself –  Alexander Feb 24 '13 at 11:53
    
mmmm....i see... –  Royi Namir Feb 24 '13 at 11:55
1  
That's quite a nice plugin. +1 –  gion_13 Feb 24 '13 at 12:10
1  
@RoyiNamir, you can try something along these lines. This is only possible by defining a root element, even though there may be corner cases –  Alexander Feb 24 '13 at 17:24

You could use a recursive function to "bubble up" the DOM until you reach the body element, then reverse this tree and use it as a selector. A little like:

function getChain(el){

    var parents = arguments[1] || [el.nodeName.toLowerCase()];

    if (el.parentNode.nodeName != 'BODY'){

        parents.push(el.parentNode.nodeName.toLowerCase());
        el = el.parentNode;

        return getChain(el, parents);

    } else {

        return parents.reverse().join('>');

    }

}

See a demo fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
I see you dont like jsbin that much...:-) –  Royi Namir Feb 24 '13 at 12:00
    
@RoyiNamir let's say I'm more of a fiddler.... –  m90 Feb 24 '13 at 12:01
    
I've update to a more correct version jsfiddle.net/rpSRp/3 –  Royi Namir Feb 24 '13 at 12:05

You can iterate over each parent node and descend into their corresponding siblings, using the path that was built up on the way down:

var chain = [$('#imthis').prop('nodeName')];

$('#imthis')
  .parentsUntil('body')
  .each(function() {
    // i'm a parent
    $(this).siblings()
      .find(chain.join('>'))
    .each(function() {
      alert(this.textContent);
    });
    chain.unshift(this.nodeName);
  });

Demo

share|improve this answer
    
maybe I wasn't clear but I dont have to know the structure(otherwise it would be pretty easy). I just have $(this) and it should find by itself other twins relative to d0 –  Royi Namir Feb 24 '13 at 11:52
    
@RoyiNamir Got it, updated answer. –  Ja͢ck Feb 24 '13 at 12:04

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