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I'm looking to write up a basic Bioinformatics course on Codeacademy. They have a nice interface for writing up a course, but it's a bit slow for testing, as one must save, then preview, then run.

So I'm looking to write up a little testing environment that mimics their one. How it appears to work is that the user-input code is read in to a function as a string, all str instances in the code are converted to unicode (I've just used regex for this) and then the code is executed with exec.

The tricky part seems to be when I want to incorporate the Submission Test.

Submission Tests need to return True, False, or a str, and are written as the body of a function. So for example:

A simplified version of what I'm looking to do:

# The submission test must be a function.
def test_code(code, CC, error):
    # Use information from errors in student code
    if error:
        return "Yada yada %s" %error

    # Use information in the raw student code
    if len(code.split("\n")) is not 2:
        return "This should be accomplished in 2 lines"

    # Have direct access to variables from the student code
    # I'd like to avoid params['y'] if possible.
    try:
        y
    except NameError:
        return "Please use the variable y"

    if y is not 8:
        return "Wrong! Check stuff"

    # Use information from print output
    if str(y) not in CC:
        return "Remember to print your variable!"

    return True

# Read in student code
student_code = """y = 8
                  print y
                  potato"""

# Catch print output
CC = StringIO.StringIO()
sys.stdout = CC

# Execute student code and catch errors
try:
    exec student_code
except Exception as e:
    error = e

# Start outputting to the terminal again
sys.stdout = sys.__stdout__

# Run the submission test
submission_test = test_code(student_code, CC.split("\n"), error)

# Output the result of the submission test
if submission_test is True:
    print("Well done!")
elif submission_test is False:
    print("Oops! You failed... Try again!")
else:
    print(submission_test)

However, I can't seem to get the variables from exec code to pass through to the submission test function (test_code in this case).

I could just execute the code in the Submission Test, but I'd like to avoid that if possible, otherwise it will have to be added to each test, which just seems unpythonic!

Any help would be greatly appreciated :)

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Your code is broken. For example the submission could contain things like code_check = None and you'll end up with not handled TypeError: 'NoneType' object is not callable at the line submission_test = code_check(code, CC, error). By the way: using == True and == False is the wrong way of checking for the truth value of an object. Just do is submission_test: print("passed") ..., or use the is operator. –  Bakuriu Feb 24 '13 at 13:43
    
Thanks for the heads-up Bakuriu. This is just for internal testing. The actual implementation is at Codeacademy. I'm not sure how their runner function works. I'm just trying to mimic their functionality, but I don't need to worry too much about the security of my runner function. I'll edit in the is usage, though :) –  Josha Inglis Feb 24 '13 at 14:00
    
Can you concatenate the submitted code and the submitted test (as strings) into one string, and run exec on that? –  unutbu Feb 24 '13 at 14:12
    
Possibly, but I still want to keep any user print statements and errors in variables that can be called by the test. That would be tricky if they are concatenated. Also, I'm not sure about the use return statements in code called with exec... –  Josha Inglis Feb 24 '13 at 14:20
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3 Answers

If you exec mystr in somedict, then somedict has a reference to every variable assigned during the execution of mystr as Python code. In addition, you can pass variables in this way, too.

>>> d = {'y': 3}
>>> exec "x = y" in d
>>> d['x']
3

You need to pass the dictionary you got from running the user code in, so that the submission check code can verify the values in it are appropriate.

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Hmm, I'd really prefer to be able to call as variables from within the submission test rather than use a dictionary. This is primarily to have a system that mimics the Codeacademy system, and allows code to be copied and pasted between the two without alteration. –  Josha Inglis Feb 24 '13 at 13:34
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It sounds like you want the code and the test to run in the same environment. Both are being submitted as strings, so perhaps the easiest way is to concatenate both and run exec on the combined string:

from __future__ import unicode_literals

def wrap_body(body):
    indent = ' '*4
    return 'def test():\n' + indent + body.replace('\n','\n'+indent)    

code = '''
bool_1 = True
bool_2 = False

str_1 = 'Hello there!'
str_2 = "I hope you've noticed the apostrophe ;)"
'''

code_test = '''
try:
    bool_1, bool_2, str_1, str_2
except NameError:
    return "Please do not alter the variable names!"

if (bool_1 == bool_2 or str_1 == str_2):
    return "Please ensure that all of your variables are different " \
           "from one another"

if type(bool_1) != bool: return "bool_1 is incorrect"
if type(bool_2) != bool: return "bool_2 is incorrect"
if type(str_1) != unicode: return "str_1 is incorrect"
if type(str_2) != unicode: return "str_2 is incorrect"

return True
'''
code_test = wrap_body(code_test)
template = code + code_test
namespace = {}
try:
    exec template in namespace
    print(namespace['test']())
except Exception as err:
    print(err)
share|improve this answer
    
This is nice! Unfortunately, I need for the submission test to run regardless of student errors, so that I can return useful, question-specific feedback. As this is currently, I'd need to have generic error handling. I've just simplified my question code, if that helps :) –  Josha Inglis Feb 25 '13 at 4:18
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Okay, my colleague figured this one out.

It uses an element of Devin Jeanpierre's answer.

We use the exec code in dictionary method, then pass the dictionary into the checking function, then, within the checking function we unpack the dictionary into the globals().

# The submission test must be a function.
def test_code(code, CC, error, code_vars):

    # unpack the student code namespace into the globals()
    globs = globals()
    for var, val in code_vars.items():
        globs[var] = val

    # Use information from errors in student code
    if error:
        return "Yada yada %s" %error

    # Use information in the raw student code
    if len(code.split("\n")) is not 2:
        return "This should be accomplished in 2 lines"

    # Have direct access to variables from the student code
    # I'd like to avoid params['y'] if possible.
    try:
        y
    except NameError:
        return "Please use the variable y"

    if y is not 8:
        return "Wrong! Check stuff"

    # Use information from print output
    if str(y) not in CC:
        return "Remember to print your variable!"

    return True

# Read in student code
student_code = """y = 8
                  print y
                  potato"""

# Catch print output
CC = StringIO.StringIO()
sys.stdout = CC

# create the namespace for the student code
code_vars = {}

# Execute student code and catch errors
try:
    # execute the student code in the created namespace
    exec student_code in code_vars
except Exception as e:
    error = e

# Start outputting to the terminal again
sys.stdout = sys.__stdout__

# Run the submission test
submission_test = test_code(student_code, CC.split("\n"), error, code_vars)

# Output the result of the submission test
if submission_test is True:
    print("Well done!")
elif submission_test is False:
    print("Oops! You failed... Try again!")
else:
    print(submission_test)
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