Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to calculate the theta complexity of this nested for loop:

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < i; j++) {
            for (int k = 0; k < j; k++) {
                // statement

I'd say it's n^3, but I don't think this is correct, because each for loop does not go from 1 to n. I did some tests:

n = 5 -> 10

10 -> 120

30 -> 4060

50 -> 19600

So it must be between n^2 and n^3. I tried the summation formula and such, but my results are way too high. Though of n^2 log(n), but that's also wrong...

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is O(N^3). The exact formula is (N*(N+1)*(N+2))/6

share|improve this answer
1  
Do you mind explaining how to get to this? –  Aaron Feb 24 '13 at 14:24
1  
I think the real formula is n * (n-1) * (n-2) / 6. Please see this running sample. Anyway, it doesn't change the fact that it's O(N^3) –  w0lf Feb 24 '13 at 14:33
1  
@w0lf I think the reason behind the discrepancy is the same as what's behind this test based on your program, where the sum of arithmetic sequence comes out as (N*(N-1))/2 rather than the well-known (N*(N+1))/2. The problem is that the loops do not start counting until i gets to 2 (or to 1 in case of two nested loops), meaning that the "mathematical" N is N-2 in your program (or N-1 in my modification of your program). Once you "remap" N->N-2, N+1 becomes N-1, and N+2 becomes N for your final formula. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 24 '13 at 14:50
1  
@Aaron The arithmetic series formula for N*(N+1)/2 is easy to prove, but the formula for SUM(x*(x+1)/2, x from 0 to N) is not that easy. Once you know the answer, you can probably prove it by induction. I'm sure if you ask on the math Q&A site you'd get a much better answer as to how to come up with this formula. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 24 '13 at 14:55
2  
That's right; I noticed that changing the < conditions to <= in the inner loops yields the correct count, based on the well known formula. I've changed the program and made versions for two and three loops. –  w0lf Feb 24 '13 at 14:57
show 8 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.