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I'm using the event SystemEvents.TimeChanged in my Windows Application and it fires twice. The code that I use:

using System;
using Microsoft.Win32;

namespace DateTimeTests
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            SystemEvents.TimeChanged += new EventHandler(SystemEvents_TimeChanged);
            Console.WriteLine("Press any key to exit");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        static void SystemEvents_TimeChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Time changed: {0}", DateTime.Now);
        }
    }
}

I tried to change the time in Windows and the event occurs twice. Why?

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure you only changed the time once? e.g. hour then minute. It's a static event that uses the message pump, so if it chucks a message in on any chnage of anypart of datetime while editing, you could get a passel of them. In fact seeing as there's no enter a value then hit the ok button that's likely is it not? – Tony Hopkinson Feb 24 '13 at 14:34

It just fires the event whenever it receives the WM_TIMECHANGE message. So you'll need to look for a reason why another program changed the time twice or, maybe over-zealously, changed the system time and broadcasted this message. Hard to speculate since you didn't describe what you did to change the time.

Of course this should never be a real problem.

share|improve this answer

Just unlink this event the 1st time it's fired and problem is solved:

static void SystemEvents_TimeChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    SystemEvents.TimeChanged -= new EventHandler(SystemEvents_TimeChanged);

    Console.WriteLine("Time changed: {0}", DateTime.Now);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Unless you want to keep handling legitimate time change events. – Blorgbeard Aug 19 '15 at 1:39

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