Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am bit confused to see that all symbols are not getting reviewed by interpreter, before we start executing the logic of program.

For example, in this listing:

def func_twice(f, x):
     f(f(x))

def square(x):
   return x * x

result = func_twice(square,2)

result is still not visible in Global frame until it gets evaluated in runtime.

and in this:

def f(x, y):
   return g(x)

def g(a):
   return a + y

f(1, 2)

y was not syntax checked until it got evaluated.

If one says, it is due to interpreted language nature and this is the way it is, How one can write Enterprise app in python, which may have many such kind of errors introduced by programmer and cannot be recovered until testing?

share|improve this question
    
You need automated unit tests. –  Vaughn Cato Feb 24 '13 at 15:38
2  
This is normal for dynamic languages. The symbols are "reviewed" to the extent that the line is syntacticly correct, but variables are only added to a namespace on first assignment. In the case of a + y, y may be in the global namespace when the function is finally called. If that means not enterprise app to you - there are lots of other languages out there. –  tdelaney Feb 24 '13 at 15:53
3  
"y was not syntax checked until it got evaluated." That's not a syntax check - it's a global variable lookup. The syntax is correct, and is checked at startup. –  Eric Feb 24 '13 at 15:54

2 Answers 2

This is because python has no variable declarations. In this code, we do not know if y exists when we declare the function g:

def f(x, y):
   return g(x)

def g(a):
   return a + y

y = 3
f(1, 2)

Only at the time of invocation of g is it checked, since until that point it can't be known

share|improve this answer
    
as you said, it can't be known, is it a disadavantage for writing big applications, where there can be lot of such errors? –  user2025667 Feb 25 '13 at 2:56

func_twice isn't returning the value of f(f(x)); it's returning None in the absence of an explicit return statement. You want

def func_twice(f, x):
    return f(f(x))
share|improve this answer
    
@eric: as you said it is glabal variable look up, but i should get a hint during running of python that y is orphan, instead of realising after entering in function g –  user2025667 Feb 25 '13 at 2:52
    
it was typo for writing return, i htink somebody edited my question. –  user2025667 Feb 26 '13 at 6:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.