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I've written a custom stream class that outputs indented text and that has manipulators that can change the indent level. All of the indenting work is implemented in a custom stream buffer class, which is used by the stream class. The buffer is working (i.e. text is indented in the output), but I can't get my manipulators to work. I was reading in a lot of places how ostream (which my class extends) overloads the operator<< like this:

ostream& ostream::operator << ( ostream& (*op)(ostream&))

{
    // call the function passed as parameter with this stream as the argument
    return (*op)(*this);
}

Which means it can take in a function as a parameter. So why aren't my "indent" or "deindent" stream functions being recognized? I'm sure I have to do some overloading of operator<<, but shouldn't I not need to? See below for my code:

#include <iostream>
#include <streambuf>
#include <locale>
#include <cstdio>

using namespace std;

class indentbuf: public streambuf {

public:

    indentbuf(streambuf* sbuf): m_sbuf(sbuf), m_indent(4), m_need(true) {}

    int indent() const { return m_indent; }
    void indent() { m_indent+=4; }
    void deindent() { if(m_indent >= 4) m_indent-= 4; }

protected:

    virtual int_type overflow(int_type c) {

        if (traits_type::eq_int_type(c, traits_type::eof()))

            return m_sbuf->sputc(c);

        if (m_need)
        {
            fill_n(ostreambuf_iterator<char>(m_sbuf), m_indent, ' ');
            m_need = false;
        }

        if (traits_type::eq_int_type(m_sbuf->sputc(c), traits_type::eof()))

            return traits_type::eof();

        if (traits_type::eq_int_type(c, traits_type::to_char_type('\n')))

            m_need = true;

        return traits_type::not_eof(c);
    }

    streambuf* m_sbuf;
    int m_indent;
    bool m_need;
};

class IndentStream : public ostream {
public:
    IndentStream(ostream &os) : ib(os.rdbuf()), ostream(&ib){};

    ostream& indent(ostream& stream) {
        ib.indent();
        return stream;
    }

   ostream& deindent(ostream& stream) {
        ib.deindent();
        return stream;
    }

private:
    indentbuf ib;
};

int main()
{
    IndentStream is(cout);
    is << "31 hexadecimal: " << hex << 31 << endl;
    is << "31 hexadecimal: " << hex << 31 << endl;
    is << "31 hexadecimal: " << hex << 31 << deindent << endl;
    return 0;
}

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
They have to be free functions outside of the class. Of course, this makes it tricky to use since you need access to information in your derived class. –  Vaughn Cato Feb 24 '13 at 16:30
    
Well you don't want to messing around with pointers-to-member-functions, that's for sure! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 24 '13 at 16:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your manipulator should be declared as a function which accepts just one argument of type ostream&. However, if you make it a member function, you know there is an implicit this argument being passed to the function as well.

Thus, you should rather declare your manipulator as a free, non-member function, making it friend of your class so that it can access its private member ib:

class IndentStream : public ostream {
public:
    IndentStream(ostream &os) : ib(os.rdbuf()), ostream(&ib){};

    ostream& indent(ostream& stream) {
        ib.indent();
        return stream;
    }

    friend ostream& deindent(ostream& stream);
//  ^^^^^^

private:
    indentbuf ib;
};

ostream& deindent(ostream& stream)
{
    IndentStream* pIndentStream = dynamic_cast<IndentStream*>(&stream);
    if (pIndentStream != nullptr)
    {
        pIndentStream->ib.deindent();
    }

    return stream;
}

int main()
{
    IndentStream is(cout);
    is << "31 hexadecimal: " << hex << 31 << endl;
    is << "31 hexadecimal: " << hex << 31 << deindent << endl;
    is << "31 hexadecimal: " << hex << 31 << endl;
    return 0;
}

Alternatively, if you really want your function to be a member, you could make it static:

class IndentStream : public ostream {
public:
    IndentStream(ostream &os) : ib(os.rdbuf()), ostream(&ib){};

    ostream& indent(ostream& stream) {
        ib.indent();
        return stream;
    }

    static ostream& deindent(ostream& stream)
    {
        IndentStream* pIndentStream = dynamic_cast<IndentStream*>(&stream);
        if (pIndentStream != nullptr)
        {
            pIndentStream->ib.deindent();
        }

        return stream;
    }

private:
    indentbuf ib;
};

However, this would force you to use a qualified name to refer to it:

int main()
{
    IndentStream is(cout);
    is << "31 hexadecimal: " << hex << 31 << endl;
    is << "31 hexadecimal: " << hex << 31 << IndentStream::deindent << endl;
    //                                       ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    is << "31 hexadecimal: " << hex << 31 << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
worked perfectly! thanks! –  AlexSilva Feb 24 '13 at 16:53
    
@AlexSilva: Glad it helpd :-) –  Andy Prowl Feb 24 '13 at 16:54

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