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Really not having a good week with encryption. Let me explain what I need.

  1. I want to encrypt string values to a file....
  2. I want to decrypt the file contents back to a string using C#
  3. I want to do this without having to worry about machine store or user store or any other store, neither a registry , etc.
  4. Any security key can be shipped in my application.

security doesn't have to be remarkably strong, and my code is obfuscated.

I just want a solution that is portable. I've tried RSA and it got me nowhere fast after finding out that in production a certain key file is missing, something I know nothing about and can't locate it on the dev machine.

Please help.

share|improve this question
10  
Almost 100% of the security of any security solution involving encryption relies upon the correct and secure management of the keys. It sounds like you have a key management problem. And since you are rejecting the solutions we provide for you -- the built-in certificate stores -- that means you are going to have to provide your own key management solution. All the security of your encryption relies upon you getting that right, so you should obtain the services of an expert rather than trying to do it yourself. You WILL get key management wrong if you're not an expert. – Eric Lippert Oct 1 '09 at 17:44
    
@Eric, its not that I don't want to implement the key, its just that I have no idea on how to find this key. If I had that answer, it would be a good start. – JL. Oct 1 '09 at 17:50
1  
The rule of thumb with security is, either do it well, or don't do it at all. Take the time to learn cryptology basics, or accept the advice experts on the subject have given you. – Yannick Motton Oct 1 '09 at 18:07
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is some code that I use quite a bit (adapted it from source on the web) which relies solely on a passphrase stored in web.config/app.config under setttings. It uses triple des.

 /// <summary>
        /// Encrypts the string.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="text">The text.</param>
        /// <returns>Encrypted string</returns>
        public string EncryptString(string text)
        {
            // Locals
            var passphrase = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Your Encrypt Passphrase"];
            byte[] results;
            var utf8 = new UTF8Encoding();

            // Step 1. We hash the passphrase using MD5
            // We use the MD5 hash generator as the result is a 128 bit byte array
            // which is a valid length for the TripleDES encoder we use below
            var hashProvider = new MD5CryptoServiceProvider();
            var tdesKey = hashProvider.ComputeHash(utf8.GetBytes(passphrase));

            // Step 2. Create a new TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider object
            // Step 3. Setup the encoder
            var tdesAlgorithm = new TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider
                                    {
                                        Key = tdesKey,
                                        Mode = CipherMode.ECB,
                                        Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7
                                    };

            // Step 4. Convert the input string to a byte[]
            var dataToEncrypt = utf8.GetBytes(text);

            // Step 5. Attempt to encrypt the string
            try
            {
                var encryptor = tdesAlgorithm.CreateEncryptor();
                results = encryptor.TransformFinalBlock(dataToEncrypt, 0, dataToEncrypt.Length);
            }
            finally
            {
                // Clear the TripleDes and Hashprovider services of any sensitive information
                tdesAlgorithm.Clear();
                hashProvider.Clear();
            }

            // Step 6. Return the encrypted string as a base64 encoded string
            return Convert.ToBase64String(results);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Decrypts the string.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="text">The text.</param>
        /// <returns>Decrypted string</returns>
        public string DecryptString(string text)
        {
            // Locals
            var passphrase = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Your Encrypt Passphrase"];
            byte[] results;
            var utf8 = new UTF8Encoding();

            // Step 1. We hash the passphrase using MD5
            // We use the MD5 hash generator as the result is a 128 bit byte array
            // which is a valid length for the TripleDES encoder we use below
            var hashProvider = new MD5CryptoServiceProvider();
            var tdesKey = hashProvider.ComputeHash(utf8.GetBytes(passphrase));

            // Step 2. Create a new TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider object
            // Step 3. Setup the decoder
            var tdesAlgorithm = new TripleDESCryptoServiceProvider
                                    {
                                        Key = tdesKey,
                                        Mode = CipherMode.ECB,
                                        Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7
                                    };

            // Step 4. Convert the input string to a byte[]
            var dataToDecrypt = Convert.FromBase64String(text);

            // Step 5. Attempt to decrypt the string
            try
            {
                var decryptor = tdesAlgorithm.CreateDecryptor();
                results = decryptor.TransformFinalBlock(dataToDecrypt, 0, dataToDecrypt.Length);
            }
            finally
            {
                // Clear the TripleDes and Hashprovider services of any sensitive information
                tdesAlgorithm.Clear();
                hashProvider.Clear();
            }

            // Step 6. Return the decrypted string in UTF8 format
            return utf8.GetString(results);
        }

The original source was here: http://www.dijksterhuis.org/encrypting-decrypting-string/

share|improve this answer
    
+1 and accepted answer, - please tell me - that there is no need to import export machine keys with this solution? – JL. Oct 1 '09 at 17:54
    
None at all. Since you are shipping your app out don't use app.config and web.config for your passphrase. Hardcode it and rely on obsfucation to hide the literal. – Keith Adler Oct 1 '09 at 17:58
    
Oh, you're shipping the app? Then this encryption is about as effective as ROT13 or XOR encoding. The weakest link will be the literal in your code. Reflector+Deblector will own your obfuscation in no time. – Yannick Motton Oct 1 '09 at 18:02
    
Yannick, crypto of literals is pretty much used across the board in obsfucators. If he puts the passphrase into the code itself there's no chance in hell that someone would be able to decrypt it. – Keith Adler Oct 1 '09 at 18:27
    
You might indeed have a hard time finding and decrypting the literal with Reflector. However since you can debug the application with Deblector the only thing you need to break on is the ComputeHash call. – Yannick Motton Oct 1 '09 at 18:38

You can't store secrets in an application. Period. If the prize is worth anything, somebody will find your secret key. In this day and age, once is enough. Google will give the answer for anybody who is interested to find that key. And once the key is compromized, it will compromize the data for everybody, everywhere.

Your secret (key) must come from outside (eg. user provided password, provisioned certificates and keys, key exchange protocols).

If you insist on storing the key in the applicaiton, thus providing a minimum level of obfuscation of the data (is not trully protected), then use a CryptoStream and symmetric key algorithm, like the Rijndael based example at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.security.cryptography.cryptostream.aspx with a hardcodded key. But you must undesrand that this is notthing but obfuscation.

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Have you looked into the Bouncy Castle API?

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From Eric's response it sounds like you may be making things more complicated than you have to; by perhaps attempting asymmetric encryption when it is not necessary?

For the type of encryption you're describing you should really just need to pass a few arguments to an encrypt and decrypt method to get your task accomplished.

Take a look at this example from CodeProject. It uses the Rijndael algorithm in a straightforward manner and even includes code for reading/writing files.

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Do you know if the method in the example is completely portable without auto generated and intangible machine keys? – JL. Oct 1 '09 at 17:53
    
i've used this example as a base for web, desktop and windows mobile apps. So it's been fairly portable. Though i do recall a little bit of tweaking necessary for the mobile side due to a missing API. In any case, looks like this question is closed. – Paul Sasik Oct 1 '09 at 17:58

If you're having trouble with creating keys try CrypTool, an enormously useful tool when learning about cryptology.

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