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I've googled this extensively and cannot find any discussions on this.

It appears (correct me if I'm wrong) that Android AppWidgets (home screen widgets) do not receive local application broadcasts via the LocalBroadcastManager. So to communicate with the widget I must use a regular system wide broadcast.

It is recommended from many sources that for efficiency and security that only local broadcasts are used. I'm trying to find a nice way to communicate to the widget while minimizing the use of Global Broadcasts.

Please let me know any suggestions to explore or resources to examine in solving this problem as well as commenting on my tentative plan:

My current plan is to minimize all of the messages to a single a message "WIDGET_NEEDS_UPDATE". This would basically "poke" the widget and tell it to look for the update information.

The update information I am going to put as static members of my AppWidgetProvider. So the widget(s) would receive this message and then read the action and any data needed to perform the action from these static members.

Does this seem reasonable?

One thing I'm not sure of yet is the lifecycle for static members: so long as an application activity or service is running will I be guaranteed to have access to these static members?

Thanks so much for your insights and direction.

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2 Answers 2

It appears (correct me if I'm wrong) that Android AppWidgets (home screen widgets) do not receive local application broadcasts via the LocalBroadcastManager. So to communicate with the widget I must use a regular system wide broadcast.

An AppWidgetProvider needs to respond to system-sent broadcasts, such as for populating the app widget's content when it is first added (ACTION_APPWIDGET_UPDATE).

However, your code (beyond the AppWidgetProvider) can push updates to the app widget's UI at any point, using AppWidgetManager and methods on it like updateAppWidget(). The trigger for when you push those updates is up to you, and it is conceivable that LocalBroadcastManager (or Otto or other message bus implementations) could play a role.

It is recommended from many sources that for efficiency and security that only local broadcasts are used.

App widgets are neither efficient nor secure, by nature. If you want efficiency, be sure to not update the app widget very often. If you want security, do not implement an app widget.

The "many sources" are giving you general advice, mostly for the case where you are the sender and you are the receiver of those broadcasts for communication between components of your app. Local broadcasts are useless for inter-process communication, and app widgets are based on inter-process communication. Your process is communicating with the home screen process, by way of an OS system process, to get your changes onto the home screen.

IOW, just because "many sources" tell you to eat less, do not stop eating entirely, as that usually causes problems. :-)

I'm trying to find a nice way to communicate to the widget while minimizing the use of Global Broadcasts.

You don't "communicate to the widget". At most, you might "communicate" with your AppWidgetProvider. An app widget itself is a set of pixels being rendered by the home screen.

You cannot get rid of the system broadcasts ("Global Broadcasts"), as the OS will send them whether you like it or not, and you need them in order to have the app widget work.

My current plan is to minimize all of the messages to a single a message "WIDGET_NEEDS_UPDATE".

That would require you to rewrite the Android operating system, as the operating system has no notion of this broadcast, and it will send the standard AppWidgetProvider broadcasts whether you like it or not. Again, you need those system broadcasts, otherwise your app widget cannot be added to the screen.

This would basically "poke" the widget and tell it to look for the update information.

It would be more efficient for you to just update the app widget's UI via AppWidgetManager.

Does this seem reasonable?

You are not obviously improving either security or efficiency.

One thing I'm not sure of yet is the lifecycle for static members: so long as an application activity or service is running will I be guaranteed to have access to these static members?

No. Static data members will live until the process is terminated, which can occur at any time for a process that is no longer in the foreground.

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I also needed to send secure broadcasts to my widget. My solution was to declare a 2nd receiver in the manifest:

<receiver android:name="com.yourpackage.widget.WidgetProvider" >
        <intent-filter>
            <action android:name="android.appwidget.action.APPWIDGET_UPDATE" />
        </intent-filter>

        <meta-data
            android:name="android.appwidget.provider"
            android:resource="@xml/widget_info" />
    </receiver>
    <receiver
        android:name="com.yourpackage.widget.CustomReceiver"
        android:enabled="true"
        android:permission="com.youurpackage.appname.PERMISSION" >
        <intent-filter>
         <action android:name="com.youurpackage.appname.INIT_DONE" />
        </intent-filter>
    </receiver>

The receiver class looks like the following:

@Override
public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {        
    if (intent.getAction().equals("com.youurpackage.appname.INIT_DONE")) {
        int[] ids = AppWidgetManager.getInstance(context).getAppWidgetIds(new ComponentName(context, WidgetProvider.class));
        for (int widgetId : ids) {                
            AppWidgetManager.getInstance(context).updateAppWidget(widgetId, new RemoteViews(context.getPackageName(), R.layout.widget_layout));
            WidgetProvider.updateWidgetData(context, widgetId);
        }
    }
}

You also must declare the permission in your manifest:

<permission
    android:name="com.youurpackage.appname.PERMISSION"
    android:description="@string/permission_description"
    android:label="@string/permission_name"
    android:protectionLevel="signature" >
</permission>

Sending broadcast with this permission will only be possible by your app. You can send a broadcast with sendBroadcast(new Intent("com.youurpackage.appname.INIT_DONE"), "com.youurpackage.appname.PERMISSION");

Please let me know if this explanation is enough for understanding my proposal.

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