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I need a two dimensional list to store information about students and their grades.

When I run my program I just get one list of the numbers but I need separate lists for each student. Can anyone help me?

This is what I've done so far:

COLS= int(input("number of students to enter "))
ROWS= int(input("number of grades per student "))

def main():
    number =[]


    for c in range(COLS):
        student =(input("enter student ID number "))
        number.append(student)

        for r in range (ROWS):
            grades =(input("Enter grade for module: "))
            number.append(grades)

    print(number)

my result is 
number of students to enter 2
number of grades per student 4
enter student ID number 1234
Enter grade for module: 55
Enter grade for module: 66
Enter grade for module: 43
Enter grade for module: 33
enter student ID number 2345
Enter grade for module: 34
Enter grade for module: 56
Enter grade for module: 78
Enter grade for module: 99
['1234', '55', '66', '43', '33', '2345', '34', '56', '78', '99']
>>> 
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Note that you are building lists here, and an easy and efficient way to do that is by using list comprehensions. –  Lattyware Feb 24 '13 at 18:11

5 Answers 5

You need to create a new list for each row:

for c in range(COLS):
    grades = []
    student =(input("enter student ID number "))
    number.append(student)
    number.append(grades)

    for r in range (ROWS):
        grade =(input("Enter grade for module: "))
        grades.append(grade)
share|improve this answer
    
+1, yours is a lot cleaner than mine. –  Hunter McMillen Feb 24 '13 at 18:06
    
This doesn't actually appear to work... when grades is appended to number, it's still empty, and grades itself is not a reference to the item actually contained in the list, so changing it doesn't update the list contained in number. –  Kyle Strand Feb 24 '13 at 18:14
1  
Everything in Python is a reference, when you update grades outside the list, it will affect what is in the list as well (as they are the same thing). –  Lattyware Feb 24 '13 at 18:17
    
Ah. Sorry, my mistake--I left off the last line while testing it. (Which is silly, because in theory I know Python is pass-by-reference; I just don't always trust it to be pass-by-reference, somehow.) –  Kyle Strand Feb 24 '13 at 18:24
    
Thank you so much :-) –  Fiona Gaughan Feb 25 '13 at 21:56

I would use a dictionary indexed by student id:

COLS= int(input("number of students to enter "))
ROWS= int(input("number of grades per student "))

def main():
    student_grades = {}

    for c in range(COLS):
        student =(input("enter student ID number "))
        grades = []

        for r in range (ROWS):
            grade =(input("Enter grade for module: "))
            grades.append(grade)
        student_grades[student] = grades
share|improve this answer
    
+1, This makes a lot of sense here - do note that in the unlikely event the order they are input matters, this won't record that (dicts are unordered). –  Lattyware Feb 24 '13 at 18:10
    
True! In that case, you could use collections.OrderedDict. –  Kyle Strand Feb 24 '13 at 18:15

As per my comment, an example of doing this with list & dict comprehensions:

cols = int(input("Number of students: "))
rows = int(input("Number of grades per student: "))

grades = {input("Enter student ID number: "): 
             [input("Enter grade for module: ") for _ in range(rows)] 
          for _ in range(cols)}

Note this is a dictionary as in Kyle Strand's answer, rather than a list. This suits the data better, and will make working with it later easier.

As another note, a better interface could be achieved by repeating this until the user decides not to enter more students, rather than asking up-front how many students will be entered:

rows = int(input("Number of grades per student: "))

def get_students():
    while True:
        value = input("Enter student ID number, or nothing to finish: ")
        if not vale:
            return
        else:
            yield value

grades = {student: [input("Enter grade for module: ") for _ in range(rows)] 
          for student in get_students()}

Here this is achieved with a generator, which yields new student numbers obtained from the user until the user enters nothing.

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Just build a list before you insert it into the number list:

for c in range(COLS):
    student =(input("enter student ID number "))
    temp_arr = [student] # make a temporary array for the student id and their grades

    for r in range (ROWS):
        grades =(input("Enter grade for module: "))
        temp.append(grades) # append to the temp array here

    # after you are done getting the grades
    # insert the entire temp array into the number array
    number.append(temp)

Also, this data would probably be stored in a better fashion if you made a class Student, which could have an id and a list of grades.

share|improve this answer

I think it would better to use a dictionary of lists instead of a two dimensional list -- a list of lists -- because it makes access to data for both input and access later easier and readable. For those same reasons I also changed its name from number in your code to grades in the code below to better reflect what is being put into it.

COLS = int(input("number of students: "))
ROWS = int(input("number of grades per student: "))

grades = {}

def main():
    for c in range(COLS):
        student = int(input("enter student ID: "))
        grades[student] = []  # initialize to empty row of grades

        for r in range(ROWS):
            grade = int(input("Enter grade for module: "))
            grades[student].append(grade)

    for student in grades.keys():
        print 'student:{}, grades:{}'.format(student, grades[student])

Output after inputting your sample data:

student:2345, grades:[34, 56, 78, 99]
student:1234, grades:[55, 66, 43, 33]
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