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I have written the following code to count number of lines,characters and words from a file. I have used BufferedReader.

import java.io.*;

class FileCount
 {


public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception
{
    FileInputStream file=new FileInputStream("sample.txt");
    BufferedReader br=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(file));
    int i;
    int countw=0,countl=0,countc=0;
    do
    {
        i=file.read();
        if((char)i==("\t"))
            countw++;
        else if((char)i=="\n")
            countl++;
        else
            countc++;



    }while(i!=-1);
    System.out.println("Number of words"+countw);
    System.out.println("Number of lines"+countw);
    System.out.println("Number of characters"+countc);
}
}

The problem is that i have to only use buffered reader.I know we can not compare char and String which i have done in my code. is there any other way out to this code?

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I don't really know much about InputStreamReader and FileInputStream but it looks like you are trying to make a new stream out of one that is already a stream. I might be wrong though, maybe try using br.read() instead of file.read(). Also, it looks like you are trying to go through each character, but you are reading more than one character at a time. Try comparing each character and not just the whole thing. –  lonnez Feb 24 '13 at 19:37
    
@lonnez - The wrapping of streams and readers is normal (decorator pettern) in Java IO. The usage is not quite right, but not in the way you seem to be suggesting. –  Don Roby Feb 24 '13 at 19:42
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, you need to actually read from the BufferedReader - but as provided above, you're really ignoring that you even have this. Instead of file.read(), you need to do br.read().

Part of the problem that you maybe already observed with your current approach is that you're probably missing characters when reading directly from file, after having attached a BufferedReader to it. The BufferedReader may pre-read characters from the stream to fill the buffer - so reading directly from file will cause those characters to be missed.

Then, you're correct, you can't compare against characters and Strings - so compare against characters:

if((char)i == ('\t'))
  countw++;
else if((char)i == '\n')
  countl++;

Once you get these issues out of the way, there are other issues that I expect you'll find - but hopefully this will be enough to get you started. (For example, are your words really separated by tab characters - or do you want to be looking for spaces, etc.?)

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