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I am trying to make an recursive analysis program with fermat's last equation, but it keeps returning that the equation is wrong I don't understand?

public class fermatdata 
{
    public static void data(int a, int b, int c, int n)
    {
        if ((Math.pow(a, n)) + (Math.pow(b, n)) == (Math.pow(c, n)))
        {   
            System.out.println("Holy smokes, Fermat was wrong!");
            return;             
        }
        else
        {               
            data(a-1, b-1, c-1, n-1);
            if (n < 2)
            {                   
                return;                 
            }
            else
            {                   
                data(a-1, b-1, c-1, n-1);                   
            }               
        }
        System.out.println("No, that doesn't work. Fermat was right");          
    }       
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println("Fermat's last theorem stated that the formula a^n + b^n = c^n while n>2 and all of the numbers are integers will never be correct. Here I am going to do an analysis with all the numbers starting at 100,000 and count backwords to 3");
        data(100000, 100000, 100000, 100000);   
    }   
}
share|improve this question
    
You first recur, then check n < 2. It's dead code, basically. –  Marko Topolnik Feb 24 '13 at 19:37
    
Be aware of double comparison if ((Math.pow(a, n)) + (Math.pow(b, n)) == (Math.pow(c, n))) you should not compare float/double with == –  iTech Feb 24 '13 at 19:39
    
How is that dead code? It just stops running the code if n is less than 2 and I start it at 100,000 so shouldn't it run all 999,997 numbers first? –  user1940007 Feb 24 '13 at 19:41
    
so I should cast those exponents to an integer? –  user1940007 Feb 24 '13 at 19:42
    
Just think about it for a second. It's pure logic. –  Marko Topolnik Feb 24 '13 at 19:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try removing the first line like this:

        data(a-1, b-1, c-1, n-1);

Ok, now see what Math.pow(100000,100000) gives (Infinity). I think the problem is that you are using values that are too high (at least for n).

share|improve this answer
    
No change it still says what it did before –  user1940007 Feb 24 '13 at 19:47
    
Ok now it gives Infitiy (see my edit). –  vikingsteve Feb 24 '13 at 19:50
    
Ha ha, so he has Infinity + Infinity == Infinity. Yes, now it makes sense. –  Marko Topolnik Feb 24 '13 at 19:50
2  
Fermat was wrong, holy smokes! ;) –  vikingsteve Feb 24 '13 at 19:50
    
Haha thank you for your help! –  user1940007 Feb 24 '13 at 19:54

The problem is that the powers you are using lead to 'Infinity' because the numbers are too big.

Since 'Infinity==Infinity' the program states that the line

 ((Math.pow(a, n)) + (Math.pow(b, n)) == (Math.pow(c, n)))

is correct

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