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I'm looking for a way to reliably determine whether C++ code is being compiled in 32 vs 64 bit. We've come up with what we think is a reasonable solution using macros, but was curious to know if people could think of cases where this might fail or if there is a better way to do this. Please note we are trying to do this in a cross-platform, multiple compiler environment.

#if ((ULONG_MAX) == (UINT_MAX))
# define IS32BIT
#else
# define IS64BIT
#endif

#ifdef IS64BIT
DoMy64BitOperation()
#else
DoMy32BitOperation()
#endif

Thanks.

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7  
If you really care what the word-size of your architecture is, then don't overlook the possibility that it's neither 32 nor 64-bit. There are 16 and 128-bit architectures out there, you know. –  alex tingle Oct 1 '09 at 19:07
    
What is the difference between the 64 bit and the 32 bit operation? –  peterchen Oct 1 '09 at 19:49
2  
You really shouldn't conditionalize this on the word-width of the target platform. Instead, use the size of the relevant datatypes directly to determine what to do. stdint.h might be your friend, or you may need to develop some appropriate typedefs of your own. –  Novelocrat Oct 19 '09 at 17:27
    
This test doesn't seem to work on Visual Studio 2008 SP1. It gets stuck on "IS64BIT" for both 32-bit and 64-bit. –  Contango Sep 9 '12 at 10:02

11 Answers 11

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Unfortunately there is no cross platform macro which defines 32 / 64 bit across the major compilers. I've found the most effective way to do this is the following.

First I pick my own representation. I prefer ENVIRONMENT64 / ENVIRONMENT32. Then I find out what all of the major compilers use for determining if it's a 64 bit environment or not and use that to set my variables.

// Check windows
#if _WIN32 || _WIN64
#if _WIN64
#define ENVIRONMENT64
#else
#define ENVIRONMENT32
#endif
#endif

// Check GCC
#if __GNUC__
#if __x86_64__ || __ppc64__
#define ENVIRONMENT64
#else
#define ENVIRONMENT32
#endif
#endif

Another easier route is to simply set these variables from the compiler command line.

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1  
well, there exist other compilers besides GCC and VS. For example QNX and GHS come to mind (although I suspect QNX has similar build-time defines to GCC). Also you forgot MIPS64 and IA64 architectures in your GCC check –  Rom Oct 1 '09 at 18:35
5  
@Rom, definitely more than 2 compilers and architectures. This is just meant to be a sample of how to approach this problem, not a complete solution. –  JaredPar Oct 1 '09 at 18:38
1  
Usually the "notes for porting this application/library to a new platform" will contain a list of all the header files that need clauses added in order to support a new compiler... –  Steve Jessop Oct 1 '09 at 18:43
1  
I say "usually". "Ideally" is probably more realistic. –  Steve Jessop Oct 1 '09 at 18:43
1  
I think you should use "#if defined(WIN32) || defined(_WIN64)" etc –  KindDragon Dec 13 '13 at 13:03
template<int> void DoMyOperationHelper();

template<> void DoMyOperationHelper<4>() 
{
  // do 32-bits operations
}

template<> void DoMyOperationHelper<8>() 
{
  // do 64-bits operations
}

// helper function just to hide clumsy syntax
inline void DoMyOperation() { DoMyOperationHelper<sizeof(size_t)>(); }

int main()
{
  // appropriate function will be selected at compile time 
  DoMyOperation(); 

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
What happens if the size_t is neither 4 nor 8? –  Jesper Oct 1 '09 at 20:17
6  
@Jesper, Then you'll get link error in the sample above. Or you could implement DoMyOperation for that case –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Oct 1 '09 at 20:40
    
Slick use of templates, and kudos for testing what matters (the size of some particular type) rather than a correlate. –  Novelocrat Oct 19 '09 at 17:25
1  
Careful with using size_t for this. You can have issues where it doesn't correspond to the pointer size for instance (eg on platforms with more than one pointer size). –  Logan Capaldo Oct 22 '09 at 12:03
1  
Standard says that size of size_t is large enough to hold size of any allocated object in system. Usually it is what you want to know while conditional compiling. If it is not what you want, you could use this snippet with some other type instead of size_t. For instance, it could be void*. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Oct 22 '09 at 12:35

That won't work on Windows for a start. Longs and ints are both 32 bits whether you're compiling for 32 bit or 64 bit windows. I would think checking if the size of a pointer is 8 bytes is probably a more reliable route.

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2  
Unfortunately sizeof is prohibited in #if directive (if you think about it preprocessor has no way to tell) –  EFraim Oct 1 '09 at 18:25
    
Yep, that's why I left it at suggesting checking the size of a pointer rather than using sizeof - I can't think of a portable way to do it off the top of my head... –  mattnewport Oct 1 '09 at 18:27
    
Question doesn't (yet) say it has to be done at pre-processor time. Many/most compilers with optimisation on will do a decent job of eliminating dead code, even if you "leave it until run time" with a test like sizeof(void*) == 8 ? Do64Bit() : Do32Bit();. That could still leave an unused function in the binary, but the expression is likely compiled just to a call to the "right" function. –  Steve Jessop Oct 1 '09 at 18:41
    
@onebyone that solves the problem of function calls, but what if I want to declare a variable a different type based on platform, that would need to be done at preprocessor unless you want to declare multiple variables and use them based on an if statement (which would also be optimized out if they're unused, but wouldn't be very pleasant in the code) –  Falaina Oct 1 '09 at 18:45
    
Then you're right, a constant expression in a conditional is no good. Kirill's approach can do what you want, though: template<int> struct Thing; template<> struct Thing<4> { typedef uint32_t type; }; template<> struct Thing<8> { typedef uint64_t type; }; typedef Thing<sizeof(void*)>::type thingtype; –  Steve Jessop Oct 1 '09 at 18:50

Unfortunately, there is no reliable method to do this purely at compile time.

  • Both _WIN32 and _WIN64 can sometimes both be undefined, if the project settings are flawed or corrupted (particularly on Visual Studio 2008 SP1).
  • A project labelled "Win32" could be set to 64-bit, due to a project configuration error.
  • On Visual Studio 2008 SP1, sometimes the intellisense does not grey out the correct parts of the code, according to the current #define. This makes it difficult to see exactly which #define is being used at compile time.

Therefore, the only reliable method is to combine 3 simple checks:

  • 1) Compile time setting, and;
  • 2) Runtime check, and;
  • 3) Robust compile time checking.

Simple check 1/3: Compile time setting

Choose any method to set the required #define variable. I suggest the method from @JaredPar:

// Check windows
#if _WIN32 || _WIN64
   #if _WIN64
     #define ENV64BIT
  #else
    #define ENV32BIT
  #endif
#endif

// Check GCC
#if __GNUC__
  #if __x86_64__ || __ppc64__
    #define ENV64BIT
  #else
    #define ENV32BIT
  #endif
#endif

Simple check 2/3: Runtime check

In main(), double check to see if sizeof() makes sense:

#if defined(ENV64BIT)
    if (sizeof(void*) != 8)
    {
        wprintf(L"ENV64BIT: Error: pointer should be 8 bytes. Exiting.");
        exit(0);
    }
    wprintf(L"Diagnostics: we are running in 64-bit mode.\n");
#elif defined (ENV32BIT)
    if (sizeof(void*) != 4)
    {
        wprintf(L"ENV32BIT: Error: pointer should be 4 bytes. Exiting.");
        exit(0);
    }
    wprintf(L"Diagnostics: we are running in 32-bit mode.\n");
#else
    #error "Must define either ENV32BIT or ENV64BIT".
#endif

Simple check 3/3: Robust compile time checking

The general rule is "every #define must end in a #else which generates an error".

#if defined(ENV64BIT)
    // 64-bit code here.
#elif defined (ENV32BIT)
    // 32-bit code here.
#else
    // INCREASE ROBUSTNESS. ALWAYS THROW AN ERROR ON THE ELSE.
    // - What if I made a typo and checked for ENV6BIT instead of ENV64BIT?
    // - What if both ENV64BIT and ENV32BIT are not defined?
    // - What if project is corrupted, and _WIN64 and _WIN32 are not defined?
    // - What if I didn't include the required header file?
    // - What if I checked for _WIN32 first instead of second?
    //   (in Windows, both are defined in 64-bit, so this will break codebase)
    // - What if the code has just been ported to a different OS?
    // - What if there is an unknown unknown, not mentioned in this list so far?
    // I'm only human, and the mistakes above would break the *entire* codebase.
    #error "Must define either ENV32BIT or ENV64BIT"
#endif

Appendix A

Incidentially, the rules above can be adapted to make your entire codebase more reliable:

  • Every if() statement ends in an "else" which generates an a warning or error.
  • Every switch() statement ends in a "default:" which generates a warning or error.

The reason why this works well is that it forces you to think of every single case in advance, and not rely on (sometimes flawed) logic in the "else" part to execute the correct code.

I used this technique (among many others) to write a 160,000 line project that has never crashed in production during 12 months of continuous operation.

share|improve this answer

You could do this:

#if __WORDSIZE == 64
char *size = "64bits";
#else
char *size = "32bits";
#endif
share|improve this answer
    
In many programming environments for C and C-derived languages on 64-bit machines, "int" variables are still 32 bits wide, but long integers and pointers are 64 bits wide. These are described as having an LP64 data model. unix.org/version2/whatsnew/lp64_wp.html –  Hermes Jun 5 at 21:46

You should be able to use the macros defined in stdint.h. In particular INTPTR_MAX is exactly the value you need.

#include <cstdint>
#if INTPTR_MAX == INT32_MAX
    #define THIS_IS_32_BIT_ENVIRONMENT
#elif INTPTR_MAX == INT64_MAX
    #define THIS_IS_64_BIT_ENVIRONMENT
#else
    #error "Environment not 32 or 64-bit."
#endif

Some (all?) versions of Microsoft's compiler don't come with stdint.h. Not sure why, since it's a standard file. Here's a version you can use: http://msinttypes.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/stdint.h

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3  
Why no stdint.h for Microsoft? Because it was introduced with the C99 standard, and Microsoft seems to have an active aversion to implementing even the easiest of stuff from C99. Even the easy library stuff that requires no compiler change. Even the stuff that's already being done when compiling for C++ (like declarations after statements). I know it needs testing, etc., but I also know that MS gets (or once got) a fair chunk of its library from Dinkumware/Plauger, and Dinkumware's had the C99 library stuff around for years. –  Michael Burr Oct 1 '09 at 19:19
2  
VC++2010 (beta 1, anyway) has <stdint.h> and <cstdint>. As for the present state of affairs - VC++ library originates from Dinkumware (still does - TR1 was taken from there as well), but from what I recall reading on VCBlog, it undergoes a fairly significant refactoring to compile cleanly with /clr, work with all MSVC non-standard types like __int64, and so on - which is why it's not as simple as just taking it and putting it into next compiler version. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 1 '09 at 19:44

"Compiled in 64 bit" is not well defined in C++.

C++ sets only lower limits for sizes such as int, long and void *. There is no guarantee that int is 64 bit even when compiled for a 64 bit platform. The model allows for e.g. 23 bit ints and sizeof(int *) != sizeof(char *)

There are different programming models for 64 bit platforms.

Your best bet is a platform specific test. Your second best, portable decision must be more specific in what is 64 bit.

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Try this:
#ifdef _WIN64
// 64 bit code
#elif _WIN32
// 32 bit code
#else
   if(sizeof(void*)==4)

       // 32 bit code
   else 

       // 64 bit code   
#endif
share|improve this answer
1  
This code is not correct. On 64-bit both _WIN32 and _WIN64 are defined. If you turn it around (first check for _WIN64) it works of course. –  BertR Jul 10 '12 at 14:26

Your approach was not too far off, but you are only checking whether long and int are of the same size. Theoretically, they could both be 64 bits, in which case your check would fail, assuming both to be 32 bits. Here is a check that actually checks the size of the types themselves, not their relative size:

#if ((UINT_MAX) == 0xffffffffu)
    #define INT_IS32BIT
#else
    #define INT_IS64BIT
#endif
#if ((ULONG_MAX) == 0xfffffffful)
    #define LONG_IS32BIT
#else
    #define LONG_IS64BIT
#endif

In principle, you can do this for any type for which you have a system defined macro with the maximal value.

Note, that the standard requires long long to be at least 64 bits even on 32 bit systems.

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If you can use project configurations in all your environments, that would make defining a 64- and 32-bit symbol easy. So you'd have project configurations like this:

32-bit Debug
32-bit Release
64-bit Debug
64-bit Release

EDIT: These are generic configurations, not targetted configurations. Call them whatever you want.

If you can't do that, I like Jared's idea.

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Or combine the two: auto-detect the configuration on the compilers you know about, but fall back to looking at a #define specified in the project/command-line/whatever on unrecognised compilers. –  Steve Jessop Oct 1 '09 at 18:45
3  
How is your VisualStudio-specific solution going to help with the OP's cross platform question?? –  alex tingle Oct 1 '09 at 18:50
    
I said if project configurations are supported. –  Jon Seigel Oct 1 '09 at 18:53
2  
@Jon: Hmm. They are NOT supported in any kind of cross-platform environment by definition. Unless it is MS's definition of cross-platform - works on newer flavors of Windows. –  EFraim Oct 1 '09 at 19:00
    
@EFraim: Yes, you can TARGET 32- or 64-bit using VS, but that is not what I am talking about. Generic project configurations, and the names I assign them, have absolutely nothing to do with platform. If project configurations are VS-specific, then that's a shame because they're very handy. –  Jon Seigel Oct 1 '09 at 19:23

I'd place 32-bit and 64-bit sources in different files and then select appropriate source files using the build system.

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This would be similar to having the build system giving you a flag such as -DBUILD_64BIT. Often, certain things are very similar to both 32 and 64 bit so having it in the same file can be quite practical. –  Alexis Wilke Oct 21 at 23:36

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