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I'm trying to figure out in c++ how to find all the prime numbers in a range (using 100 for now)

I'm not to concerned about performance, I'm starting out in c++ and trying to understand this program exercise from my book. I have my program I'm trying to use below but it keeps returning false. Any ideas? I've read through almost all of googles/bing's help as well as stack overflow. I can write code for it to work with inputting the number; just not looping through all numbers

any ideas on what i'm doing wrong?

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

bool isPrime(long n);
int main() 
{
    int i;
    //some vars
    char emptyVar;

    //first loop (to increment the number)
    for (i = 0; i <= 100; i++)
    {
        //checking all numbers below 100

        if (isPrime(i) == true)
        {
            //is true
            cout << i << ", ";
        }
        else if (isPrime(i) == false)
        {
            //is false
            cout <<"false , ";
        }
    }
    cin >> emptyVar;
}

bool isPrime(long n)
{
    long i =0;
    //checks to see if the number is a prime
    for (i = 2; i < n; i++) // sqrt is the highest possible factor
    {
        if ( n % i == 0) // when dividing numbers there is no remainder if the numbers are both factors
        {
            // is a factor and not prime
            return false;
        }
        else if (n % i != 0 && i >= 100)
        {
            //is not a factor
            return true;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
else if (n % i != 0 && i >= 100) should be else if (i > n/i). –  Will Ness Feb 25 '13 at 14:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The function isPrime does not have a return statement for every possible path of execution. For example, what does isPrime do, when n == 2?

Here's how a for loop works (in pseudo code). The general syntax is

for (initialiazion; condition; increment) {
   body;
}
rest;

This can be translated into a while-loop:

initialiazion;
while (condition) {
  body;
  increment;
}
rest;

Especially, the condition is checked right after the intialization, before body is executed.

I suspect, you think that a for loop works like this:

initialiazion;
do {
  body;
  increment;
} while (condition);
rest;

i.e. the condition is checked after the first increment. But it doesn't.

share|improve this answer
    
So based on your feedback it would be more appropriate to use a while loop for "i < n" for example and check all numbers against n while in that loop, that way the bool can return within the while loop if it's a factor and if there are no factor's it will exit the loop and then i can return to the main function? I guess that makes sense I need to keep the function going while I have the condition true opposed to doing things while a condition is true... –  LeviTheDegu Feb 24 '13 at 20:43
    
I didn't want to suggest any particular loop construct. You can surely solve the problem with any kind of loop construct. What I wanted to point out is, that you have to know exactly, what your particular loop constuct does. The different loop constructs, that C++ provides, are basically syntactic sugar and it's often a matter of personal taste, which one is used. –  Oswald Feb 24 '13 at 20:47

It should return true if it's not a factor of EVERY i, not just the first one it encounters.

bool isPrime(long n)
{
    long i =0;
    //checks to see if the number is a prime
    for (i = 2; i < n ; i++) // sqrt is the highest possible factor
    {
        if ( n % i == 0) // when dividing numbers there is no remainder if the numbers are both factors
        {
            // is a factor and not prime
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true; 

}

Also in your case you doesn't make sense to search beyond i > n/2. Of course you should give a look to the literature, the are really robust primality test algorithms.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I was running i <= sqrt(n); however I was attempting to simplify the statement when trying to get things to work. and how would I wait to check for true until all is are compared? –  LeviTheDegu Feb 24 '13 at 20:38
    
As you can see in the code above it returns true only after the for is finished. In your code you returned true every time you found a non-divisor. –  kabamaru Feb 25 '13 at 13:23

Your isPrime function is incorrect. It should check all numbers and only then return true;

And this block wouldn't be ever called on your inputs:

    else if (n % i != 0 && i >= 100)
    {
        //is not a factor
        return true;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
How would I go about waiting until then? Should the return statement just be outside of the for statement? or is there something else I'm missing. the i >= 100 was attempting to accomplish that but apparently I fail a little to hard. –  LeviTheDegu Feb 24 '13 at 20:36

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